Thu, October 24, 2019 | 00:17
  1. Opposition leader has his head shaved; declares all-out fight against Moon [VIDEO]
    Main opposition Liberty Korea Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn has his head shaved near Cheong Wa Dae, Monday. Hwang became the latest politician to have their heads shaved to protest President Moon Jae-in's appointment of key political ally Cho Kuk as justice minister despite allegations of academic fraud and financial crimes surrounding his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe leader of the main opposition Liberty Korea Party (LKP) had his head shaved Monday in a show of protest, calling for the resignation of the justice minister, whose family is embroiled in corruption allegations.Politicians here often have their heads shaved in public to express dissent over political and social issues.LKP Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn had his head shaved at a plaza in front of Cheong Wa Dae to emphasize his call for Justice Minister Cho Kuk to step down.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family."Minister Cho should voluntarily step down from the post and face the prosecution's probe," Hwang said.Hwang followed in the steps of the LKP's Rep. Park In-sook who had her head shaved Tuesday. Rep. Lee Un-ju, an independent lawmaker, did the same thing last week.President Moon sent senior secretary for political affairs Kang Gi-jung to deliver a message of "concern and worry" over Hwang's move.Kang asked Hwang to reconsider the head-shaving move, according to Cheong Wa Dae spokeswoman Ko Min-jung. In response, the LKP leader reiterated that Moon should fire Cho.The presidential office wants to resolve a list of pending issues related to people's livelihoods via dialogue, Ko said.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA barber shaves Hwang's head using an electric shaver. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA throng of journalists and citizens watched his head shaving. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukHwang's hair lies on the ground. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe LKP protest comes after Moon appointed Cho as the new minister last week despite the prosecution's investigation into the corruption allegations.The prosecution is looking into suspicious investments in a private equity fund by Cho's family members.His wife was also indicted on the charge of fabricating a school certificate for her daughter.Cho denied any knowledge of the allegations during a National Assembly confirmation hearing held Sept. 6.Moon said last week that if he did not appoint Cho solely due to “unproven” suspicions, the move would set a bad precedent.The ruling Democratic Party of Korea (DPK) and the minor liberal Party for Democracy and Peace condemned Hwang's actions as a political move aimed at intensifying partisan wrangling."Hwang's move is nothing but an act to spark political strife or to reaffirm his (political) existence," the DPK said.Conservative opposition parties have condemned Moon's appointment of Cho and called for him to be dismissed.In particular, the LKP took issue with the ruling party and government's move to revise guidelines over the prosecution's handling of the media.The two will hold a consultative meeting Wednesday to discuss ways to limit prosecutors' alleged leaks to the press of details about their investigations and the indictment of suspects.They are considering setting a new stipulation under which the justice minister would be able to order surveillance of prosecutors suspected of leaking details to the media.Rep. Na Kyung-won, left, LKP floor leader, looks at Hwang. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSome LKP members also had their heads shaved before Hwang's head-shaving ceremony. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe justice minister oversees the prosecution in terms of human resources and administration."They are hampering the prosecution probe by hook or by crook. They are effectively blocking the investigation (into Cho's family)," LKP floor leader Na Kyung-won said at a meeting with members of the party's Supreme Council.The minor opposition Bareunmirae Party (BP) began to collect signatures from its lawmakers to submit a proposal to launch a National Assembly investigation into Cho.A proposal to demand an Assembly probe requires at least the participation of one-fourth of existing lawmakers, which means 75. As the BP controls 28 seats in the 297-member parliament, it needs cooperation from the LKP to submit the proposal.The ruling DPK, meanwhile, slammed the opposition parties for “focusing on political wrangling” and shunning calls to “improve the people's livelihoods.”"It is the prosecution that will investigate," DPK floor leader Lee In-young said at a party meeting. "It is time for the National Assembly to play a responsible role for the people's lives." (Yonhap)
    Main opposition Liberty Korea Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn has his head shaved near Cheong Wa Dae, Monday. Hwang became the latest politician to have their heads shaved to protest President Moon Jae-in's appointment of key political ally Cho Kuk as justice minister despite allegations of academic fraud and financial crimes surrounding his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe leader of the main opposition Liberty Korea Party (LKP) had his head shaved Monday in a show of protest, calling for the resignation of the justice minister, whose family is embroiled in corruption allegations.Politicians here often have their heads shaved in public to express dissent over political and social issues.LKP Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn had his head shaved at a plaza in front of Cheong Wa Dae to emphasize his call for Justice Minister Cho Kuk to step down.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family."Minister Cho should voluntarily step down from the post and face the prosecution's probe," Hwang said.Hwang followed in the steps of the LKP's Rep. Park In-sook who had her head shaved Tuesday. Rep. Lee Un-ju, an independent lawmaker, did the same thing last week.President Moon sent senior secretary for political affairs Kang Gi-jung to deliver a message of "concern and worry" over Hwang's move.Kang asked Hwang to reconsider the head-shaving move, according to Cheong Wa Dae spokeswoman Ko Min-jung. In response, the LKP leader reiterated that Moon should fire Cho.The presidential office wants to resolve a list of pending issues related to people's livelihoods via dialogue, Ko said.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA barber shaves Hwang's head using an electric shaver. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA throng of journalists and citizens watched his head shaving. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukHwang's hair lies on the ground. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe LKP protest comes after Moon appointed Cho as the new minister last week despite the prosecution's investigation into the corruption allegations.The prosecution is looking into suspicious investments in a private equity fund by Cho's family members.His wife was also indicted on the charge of fabricating a school certificate for her daughter.Cho denied any knowledge of the allegations during a National Assembly confirmation hearing held Sept. 6.Moon said last week that if he did not appoint Cho solely due to “unproven” suspicions, the move would set a bad precedent.The ruling Democratic Party of Korea (DPK) and the minor liberal Party for Democracy and Peace condemned Hwang's actions as a political move aimed at intensifying partisan wrangling."Hwang's move is nothing but an act to spark political strife or to reaffirm his (political) existence," the DPK said.Conservative opposition parties have condemned Moon's appointment of Cho and called for him to be dismissed.In particular, the LKP took issue with the ruling party and government's move to revise guidelines over the prosecution's handling of the media.The two will hold a consultative meeting Wednesday to discuss ways to limit prosecutors' alleged leaks to the press of details about their investigations and the indictment of suspects.They are considering setting a new stipulation under which the justice minister would be able to order surveillance of prosecutors suspected of leaking details to the media.Rep. Na Kyung-won, left, LKP floor leader, looks at Hwang. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSome LKP members also had their heads shaved before Hwang's head-shaving ceremony. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe justice minister oversees the prosecution in terms of human resources and administration."They are hampering the prosecution probe by hook or by crook. They are effectively blocking the investigation (into Cho's family)," LKP floor leader Na Kyung-won said at a meeting with members of the party's Supreme Council.The minor opposition Bareunmirae Party (BP) began to collect signatures from its lawmakers to submit a proposal to launch a National Assembly investigation into Cho.A proposal to demand an Assembly probe requires at least the participation of one-fourth of existing lawmakers, which means 75. As the BP controls 28 seats in the 297-member parliament, it needs cooperation from the LKP to submit the proposal.The ruling DPK, meanwhile, slammed the opposition parties for “focusing on political wrangling” and shunning calls to “improve the people's livelihoods.”"It is the prosecution that will investigate," DPK floor leader Lee In-young said at a party meeting. "It is time for the National Assembly to play a responsible role for the people's lives." (Yonhap)
  2. Celebrating Korea-Czech relations
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
  3. To-be-built dormitory
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
  4. Return of Goryeo treasure
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
  5. Beauty pageant
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
  6. Dami Im in Seoul
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
  7. PM visits Tokyo's Korea Town [PHOTOS]
    Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visits Korea Town in Shinokubo, Tokyo, on Tuesday after attending the coronation of new Japanese emperor Naruhito. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Dong Sun-hwaSouth Korean Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visited Korea Town in Shinokubo, Tokyo, Tuesday, after attending the coronation ceremony for Japan's new emperor Naruhito. Lee tried a hot dog and toured the neighborhood lined with Korean eateries and K-pop shops. He reportedly asked store owners how business was. A big crowd turned out to greet him. Lee is set to meet Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday morning and deliver President Moon Jae-in's letter to him. Lee's visit raised hope that Seoul-Tokyo relations will improve. The two countries have imposed trade sanctions, among other things, sending relations to their lowest point.Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visits a food stand in Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukLee tries a hot dog in Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA big crowd gathers for Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon's visit. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA woman in the crowd claps during the Prime Minister's visit. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukChildren are among the crowd for Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon's visit to Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visits Korea Town in Shinokubo, Tokyo, on Tuesday after attending the coronation of new Japanese emperor Naruhito. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Dong Sun-hwaSouth Korean Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visited Korea Town in Shinokubo, Tokyo, Tuesday, after attending the coronation ceremony for Japan's new emperor Naruhito. Lee tried a hot dog and toured the neighborhood lined with Korean eateries and K-pop shops. He reportedly asked store owners how business was. A big crowd turned out to greet him. Lee is set to meet Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday morning and deliver President Moon Jae-in's letter to him. Lee's visit raised hope that Seoul-Tokyo relations will improve. The two countries have imposed trade sanctions, among other things, sending relations to their lowest point.Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visits a food stand in Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukLee tries a hot dog in Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA big crowd gathers for Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon's visit. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA woman in the crowd claps during the Prime Minister's visit. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukChildren are among the crowd for Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon's visit to Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  8. Para Games: Shall we dance? [PHOTOS]
    Competitors in sports dance at the 39th National Para Games make their entrance at the Seocho Sports Complex in Seoul's Seocho District, Friday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe athletes competed in pairs ― one able-bodied and the other with physical disability. The competition promotes a message that both groups exercise their athleticism on the same playing field. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe dancers stepped out to cha-cha, rumba, samba, pasodoble and Latin Jive tunes. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSports dance was selected as an official program of the Games in Korea in 2007, in Andong, North Gyeongsang Province. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukOn the fourth day of the Games, the athletes included those with physical disabilities, impaired hearing, visual disturbances, impaired spinal cords and cerebral palsy. Those with visual disabilities wore eye patches during the event. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA pair rests after performing. This year, 56 men and 59 women participated in the program. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Competitors in sports dance at the 39th National Para Games make their entrance at the Seocho Sports Complex in Seoul's Seocho District, Friday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe athletes competed in pairs ― one able-bodied and the other with physical disability. The competition promotes a message that both groups exercise their athleticism on the same playing field. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe dancers stepped out to cha-cha, rumba, samba, pasodoble and Latin Jive tunes. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSports dance was selected as an official program of the Games in Korea in 2007, in Andong, North Gyeongsang Province. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukOn the fourth day of the Games, the athletes included those with physical disabilities, impaired hearing, visual disturbances, impaired spinal cords and cerebral palsy. Those with visual disabilities wore eye patches during the event. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA pair rests after performing. This year, 56 men and 59 women participated in the program. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  9. Blind footballers show off their skills [PHOTOS]
    Blind football players compete for the ball in a B1 game between South Chungcheong Province (blue) and North Gyeongsang Province (orange) during the 39th annual National Sports Festival for the Disabled at a stadium in Sangam-dong, Seoul, Thursday. The South Chungcheong Province team won 2-1. Athletes in the B1 classification are totally or almost totally blind. They play by relying on bell sounds from the ball and the voices of their coaches. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA South Chungcheong Province player uses dribbling skills to break through the defense. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA South Chungcheong Province player listens to his coach's instructions. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPlayers compete for the ball during the match. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe ball is modified to make a jingling sound. Players are required to say "go," or something similar when going for the ball. This alerts other players to their position. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA North Chungcheong Province player bleeds after bumping into another player during the game. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Blind football players compete for the ball in a B1 game between South Chungcheong Province (blue) and North Gyeongsang Province (orange) during the 39th annual National Sports Festival for the Disabled at a stadium in Sangam-dong, Seoul, Thursday. The South Chungcheong Province team won 2-1. Athletes in the B1 classification are totally or almost totally blind. They play by relying on bell sounds from the ball and the voices of their coaches. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA South Chungcheong Province player uses dribbling skills to break through the defense. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA South Chungcheong Province player listens to his coach's instructions. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPlayers compete for the ball during the match. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe ball is modified to make a jingling sound. Players are required to say "go," or something similar when going for the ball. This alerts other players to their position. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA North Chungcheong Province player bleeds after bumping into another player during the game. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  10. Hang time on wheelchairs [PHOTOS]
    No audience at a sports event ―similar to what happened at Tuesday's high-profile World Cup qualifier match between the two Koreas in Pyongyang ― is common in South Korea. The action here is from the final-eight men's basketball match of the 39th National Para Games between Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, in orange, and Sejong Metropolitan Autonomous City at the Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education student gymnasium in Songpa District, Wednesday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPlayers compete for the ball during the match at the Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education student gymnasium in Songpa District, Wednesday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukKim Ji-hyuk from Jeju Special Self-Governing Province loses balance and is tipped out of his wheelchair after heated body contact with Sejong Metropolitan Autonomous City players. Court staff rushed to help the fallen athlete resume the game. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukJeju Special Self-Governing Province's Kim Ji-hyuk shoots over a Sejong Metropolitan Autonomous City defender. Kim's effort contributed to the team's 95-22 landslide win, advancing them to the semi-final against Team Seoul on Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAfter the match, Sejong Metropolitan Autonomous City players rest outside the court where the next match between Daejeon Metropolitan City and Gyeonggi Province had just started. The players weren't provided with locker rooms so courtside spaces were the next-best places where they could change. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA medical staff member from Jeju Special Self-Governing Province treats a player during the match. The Jeju players, who suffer physical disabilities, had no medical room for treatment near the court. The same applied for the Sejong athletes. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    No audience at a sports event ―similar to what happened at Tuesday's high-profile World Cup qualifier match between the two Koreas in Pyongyang ― is common in South Korea. The action here is from the final-eight men's basketball match of the 39th National Para Games between Jeju Special Self-Governing Province, in orange, and Sejong Metropolitan Autonomous City at the Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education student gymnasium in Songpa District, Wednesday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPlayers compete for the ball during the match at the Seoul Metropolitan Office of Education student gymnasium in Songpa District, Wednesday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukKim Ji-hyuk from Jeju Special Self-Governing Province loses balance and is tipped out of his wheelchair after heated body contact with Sejong Metropolitan Autonomous City players. Court staff rushed to help the fallen athlete resume the game. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukJeju Special Self-Governing Province's Kim Ji-hyuk shoots over a Sejong Metropolitan Autonomous City defender. Kim's effort contributed to the team's 95-22 landslide win, advancing them to the semi-final against Team Seoul on Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAfter the match, Sejong Metropolitan Autonomous City players rest outside the court where the next match between Daejeon Metropolitan City and Gyeonggi Province had just started. The players weren't provided with locker rooms so courtside spaces were the next-best places where they could change. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA medical staff member from Jeju Special Self-Governing Province treats a player during the match. The Jeju players, who suffer physical disabilities, had no medical room for treatment near the court. The same applied for the Sejong athletes. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  11. Beyond disability [PHOTOS]
    Wheelchair rugby players compete for the ball in a match between South Chungcheong Province and North Gyeongsang Province at a gymnasium in Eunpyeong, Seoul, Tuesday. The 39th annual National Sports Festival for the Disabled began on Tuesday, with 9,000 participants, including athletes and their guardians. They will compete in 30 sports at 34 venues in Seoul over five days. North Gyeongsang Province won the rugby game 69-11. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukWheelchair rugby players vie for the ball. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPlayers compete for the ball. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukIt's a tough game ― a player flips on to his side. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA game manager helps the player up. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA player smiles with his tongue out. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Wheelchair rugby players compete for the ball in a match between South Chungcheong Province and North Gyeongsang Province at a gymnasium in Eunpyeong, Seoul, Tuesday. The 39th annual National Sports Festival for the Disabled began on Tuesday, with 9,000 participants, including athletes and their guardians. They will compete in 30 sports at 34 venues in Seoul over five days. North Gyeongsang Province won the rugby game 69-11. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukWheelchair rugby players vie for the ball. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPlayers compete for the ball. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukIt's a tough game ― a player flips on to his side. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA game manager helps the player up. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA player smiles with his tongue out. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk