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Sun, May 31, 2020 | 03:40
  1. Opposition leader has his head shaved; declares all-out fight against Moon [VIDEO]
    Main opposition Liberty Korea Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn has his head shaved near Cheong Wa Dae, Monday. Hwang became the latest politician to have their heads shaved to protest President Moon Jae-in's appointment of key political ally Cho Kuk as justice minister despite allegations of academic fraud and financial crimes surrounding his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe leader of the main opposition Liberty Korea Party (LKP) had his head shaved Monday in a show of protest, calling for the resignation of the justice minister, whose family is embroiled in corruption allegations.Politicians here often have their heads shaved in public to express dissent over political and social issues.LKP Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn had his head shaved at a plaza in front of Cheong Wa Dae to emphasize his call for Justice Minister Cho Kuk to step down.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family."Minister Cho should voluntarily step down from the post and face the prosecution's probe," Hwang said.Hwang followed in the steps of the LKP's Rep. Park In-sook who had her head shaved Tuesday. Rep. Lee Un-ju, an independent lawmaker, did the same thing last week.President Moon sent senior secretary for political affairs Kang Gi-jung to deliver a message of "concern and worry" over Hwang's move.Kang asked Hwang to reconsider the head-shaving move, according to Cheong Wa Dae spokeswoman Ko Min-jung. In response, the LKP leader reiterated that Moon should fire Cho.The presidential office wants to resolve a list of pending issues related to people's livelihoods via dialogue, Ko said.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA barber shaves Hwang's head using an electric shaver. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA throng of journalists and citizens watched his head shaving. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukHwang's hair lies on the ground. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe LKP protest comes after Moon appointed Cho as the new minister last week despite the prosecution's investigation into the corruption allegations.The prosecution is looking into suspicious investments in a private equity fund by Cho's family members.His wife was also indicted on the charge of fabricating a school certificate for her daughter.Cho denied any knowledge of the allegations during a National Assembly confirmation hearing held Sept. 6.Moon said last week that if he did not appoint Cho solely due to “unproven” suspicions, the move would set a bad precedent.The ruling Democratic Party of Korea (DPK) and the minor liberal Party for Democracy and Peace condemned Hwang's actions as a political move aimed at intensifying partisan wrangling."Hwang's move is nothing but an act to spark political strife or to reaffirm his (political) existence," the DPK said.Conservative opposition parties have condemned Moon's appointment of Cho and called for him to be dismissed.In particular, the LKP took issue with the ruling party and government's move to revise guidelines over the prosecution's handling of the media.The two will hold a consultative meeting Wednesday to discuss ways to limit prosecutors' alleged leaks to the press of details about their investigations and the indictment of suspects.They are considering setting a new stipulation under which the justice minister would be able to order surveillance of prosecutors suspected of leaking details to the media.Rep. Na Kyung-won, left, LKP floor leader, looks at Hwang. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSome LKP members also had their heads shaved before Hwang's head-shaving ceremony. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe justice minister oversees the prosecution in terms of human resources and administration."They are hampering the prosecution probe by hook or by crook. They are effectively blocking the investigation (into Cho's family)," LKP floor leader Na Kyung-won said at a meeting with members of the party's Supreme Council.The minor opposition Bareunmirae Party (BP) began to collect signatures from its lawmakers to submit a proposal to launch a National Assembly investigation into Cho.A proposal to demand an Assembly probe requires at least the participation of one-fourth of existing lawmakers, which means 75. As the BP controls 28 seats in the 297-member parliament, it needs cooperation from the LKP to submit the proposal.The ruling DPK, meanwhile, slammed the opposition parties for “focusing on political wrangling” and shunning calls to “improve the people's livelihoods.”"It is the prosecution that will investigate," DPK floor leader Lee In-young said at a party meeting. "It is time for the National Assembly to play a responsible role for the people's lives." (Yonhap)
    Main opposition Liberty Korea Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn has his head shaved near Cheong Wa Dae, Monday. Hwang became the latest politician to have their heads shaved to protest President Moon Jae-in's appointment of key political ally Cho Kuk as justice minister despite allegations of academic fraud and financial crimes surrounding his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe leader of the main opposition Liberty Korea Party (LKP) had his head shaved Monday in a show of protest, calling for the resignation of the justice minister, whose family is embroiled in corruption allegations.Politicians here often have their heads shaved in public to express dissent over political and social issues.LKP Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn had his head shaved at a plaza in front of Cheong Wa Dae to emphasize his call for Justice Minister Cho Kuk to step down.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family."Minister Cho should voluntarily step down from the post and face the prosecution's probe," Hwang said.Hwang followed in the steps of the LKP's Rep. Park In-sook who had her head shaved Tuesday. Rep. Lee Un-ju, an independent lawmaker, did the same thing last week.President Moon sent senior secretary for political affairs Kang Gi-jung to deliver a message of "concern and worry" over Hwang's move.Kang asked Hwang to reconsider the head-shaving move, according to Cheong Wa Dae spokeswoman Ko Min-jung. In response, the LKP leader reiterated that Moon should fire Cho.The presidential office wants to resolve a list of pending issues related to people's livelihoods via dialogue, Ko said.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA barber shaves Hwang's head using an electric shaver. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA throng of journalists and citizens watched his head shaving. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukHwang's hair lies on the ground. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe LKP protest comes after Moon appointed Cho as the new minister last week despite the prosecution's investigation into the corruption allegations.The prosecution is looking into suspicious investments in a private equity fund by Cho's family members.His wife was also indicted on the charge of fabricating a school certificate for her daughter.Cho denied any knowledge of the allegations during a National Assembly confirmation hearing held Sept. 6.Moon said last week that if he did not appoint Cho solely due to “unproven” suspicions, the move would set a bad precedent.The ruling Democratic Party of Korea (DPK) and the minor liberal Party for Democracy and Peace condemned Hwang's actions as a political move aimed at intensifying partisan wrangling."Hwang's move is nothing but an act to spark political strife or to reaffirm his (political) existence," the DPK said.Conservative opposition parties have condemned Moon's appointment of Cho and called for him to be dismissed.In particular, the LKP took issue with the ruling party and government's move to revise guidelines over the prosecution's handling of the media.The two will hold a consultative meeting Wednesday to discuss ways to limit prosecutors' alleged leaks to the press of details about their investigations and the indictment of suspects.They are considering setting a new stipulation under which the justice minister would be able to order surveillance of prosecutors suspected of leaking details to the media.Rep. Na Kyung-won, left, LKP floor leader, looks at Hwang. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSome LKP members also had their heads shaved before Hwang's head-shaving ceremony. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe justice minister oversees the prosecution in terms of human resources and administration."They are hampering the prosecution probe by hook or by crook. They are effectively blocking the investigation (into Cho's family)," LKP floor leader Na Kyung-won said at a meeting with members of the party's Supreme Council.The minor opposition Bareunmirae Party (BP) began to collect signatures from its lawmakers to submit a proposal to launch a National Assembly investigation into Cho.A proposal to demand an Assembly probe requires at least the participation of one-fourth of existing lawmakers, which means 75. As the BP controls 28 seats in the 297-member parliament, it needs cooperation from the LKP to submit the proposal.The ruling DPK, meanwhile, slammed the opposition parties for “focusing on political wrangling” and shunning calls to “improve the people's livelihoods.”"It is the prosecution that will investigate," DPK floor leader Lee In-young said at a party meeting. "It is time for the National Assembly to play a responsible role for the people's lives." (Yonhap)
  2. Celebrating Korea-Czech relations
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
  3. To-be-built dormitory
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
  4. Return of Goryeo treasure
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
  5. Beauty pageant
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
  6. Dami Im in Seoul
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
  7. How Koreans celebrate Buddha's Birthday amid pandemic [PHOTOS]
    A Buddhism follower washes a small statue of Buddha in a celebration for Buddha's 2564th birthday in the main hall of Jogye temple in downtown Seoul, Thursday. Leaders of the religion called for concerted nationwide efforts to overcome the pandemic and help affected people. Major Buddhism sects observed the holiday without large-scale ceremonial gatherings to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulA woman bows with her hands pressed together at Jogye temple in downtown Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulKorea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulFollowers in masks attend a celebration ceremony on Thursday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulKorea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulKorea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
    A Buddhism follower washes a small statue of Buddha in a celebration for Buddha's 2564th birthday in the main hall of Jogye temple in downtown Seoul, Thursday. Leaders of the religion called for concerted nationwide efforts to overcome the pandemic and help affected people. Major Buddhism sects observed the holiday without large-scale ceremonial gatherings to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulA woman bows with her hands pressed together at Jogye temple in downtown Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulKorea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulFollowers in masks attend a celebration ceremony on Thursday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulKorea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulKorea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
  8. Baseball returns to South Korea without fans [PHOTOS]
    Stadium seats are empty as a part of precaution against the new coronavirus during the pre-season baseball game between Doosan Bears and LG Twins in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. South Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSouth Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSouth Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSouth Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulStadium seats are empty as a part of precaution against the new coronavirus during the pre-season baseball game between Doosan Bears and LG Twins in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSouth Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulStadium seats are empty as a part of precaution against the new coronavirus during the pre-season baseball game between Doosan Bears and LG Twins in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. South Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
    Stadium seats are empty as a part of precaution against the new coronavirus during the pre-season baseball game between Doosan Bears and LG Twins in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. South Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSouth Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSouth Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSouth Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulStadium seats are empty as a part of precaution against the new coronavirus during the pre-season baseball game between Doosan Bears and LG Twins in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSouth Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulStadium seats are empty as a part of precaution against the new coronavirus during the pre-season baseball game between Doosan Bears and LG Twins in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, April 21, 2020. South Korea's professional baseball league has decided to begin its new season on May 5, initially without fans, following a postponement over the coronavirus. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
  9. Alleged sex predator with face revealed thanks police for stopping the 'evil' he was [PHOTOS]
    Cho Ju-bin, 24, the prime suspect in a sexual blackmail scandal using the app Telegram, is questioned by reporters early Wednesday as he was being transferred to the prosecution from a detention unit at Jongno Police Station in central Seoul. The alleged victims of the scheme included underage girls among 74 women who police said Cho had blackmailed into sending him their images in sexual acts. Cho's identify was made public after a record 5 million people petitioned on the presidential office website. “I apologize to those who were hurt by me,” Cho told reporters, but didn't admit to the charges against him. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulCharges against Cho, who often goes by the nickname "baksa," or doctor, include violation of the act on the protection of children and youth against sex offenses, among others. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul"Thank you for putting the brakes on an evil that could not be stopped." Cho talks about his alleged crimes to reporters. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe amount of money Cho has gained from his alleged crimes is yet to be investigated. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
    Cho Ju-bin, 24, the prime suspect in a sexual blackmail scandal using the app Telegram, is questioned by reporters early Wednesday as he was being transferred to the prosecution from a detention unit at Jongno Police Station in central Seoul. The alleged victims of the scheme included underage girls among 74 women who police said Cho had blackmailed into sending him their images in sexual acts. Cho's identify was made public after a record 5 million people petitioned on the presidential office website. “I apologize to those who were hurt by me,” Cho told reporters, but didn't admit to the charges against him. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulCharges against Cho, who often goes by the nickname "baksa," or doctor, include violation of the act on the protection of children and youth against sex offenses, among others. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul"Thank you for putting the brakes on an evil that could not be stopped." Cho talks about his alleged crimes to reporters. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe amount of money Cho has gained from his alleged crimes is yet to be investigated. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
  10. Heaviest snowfall of the year arrived in Seoul [PHOTOS]
    A man dressed in South Korean traditional "Hanbok" attire wears a face mask in the snow as he gestures to take photos at the Gyeongbok Palace, the main royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020. Chinese authorities on Monday reported a slight upturn in new virus cases and hundred more deaths for a total of thousands since the outbreak began two months ago. AP An Imperial guard wearing a face mask stands in the snow outside the Gyeongbok Palace, the main royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020. APImperial guards wearing face masks stand in the snow at the Gyeongbok Palace, the main royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty, in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020.  APImperial guards wearing face masks march in the snow at the Gyeongbok Palace, the main royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty, in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020. AP
    A man dressed in South Korean traditional "Hanbok" attire wears a face mask in the snow as he gestures to take photos at the Gyeongbok Palace, the main royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020. Chinese authorities on Monday reported a slight upturn in new virus cases and hundred more deaths for a total of thousands since the outbreak began two months ago. AP An Imperial guard wearing a face mask stands in the snow outside the Gyeongbok Palace, the main royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020. APImperial guards wearing face masks stand in the snow at the Gyeongbok Palace, the main royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty, in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020.  APImperial guards wearing face masks march in the snow at the Gyeongbok Palace, the main royal palace during the Joseon Dynasty, in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, Feb. 17, 2020. AP
  11. U2 The Joshua Tree Tour 2019 - Seoul [PHOTOS]
    Bono of U2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. YonhapU2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. YonhapU2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. YonhapU2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. YonhapBono of U2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. Yonhap
    Bono of U2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. YonhapU2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. YonhapU2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. YonhapU2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. YonhapBono of U2 performs at the Gocheok Sky Dome on December 08, 2019 in Seoul, South Korea. Yonhap
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