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Fri, November 15, 2019 | 04:21
  1. Liberation Day on Seoul's streets [PHOTOS]
    A bronze statue representing a Korean forced laborer in Japan during the Japanese colonial period, at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, stands under a downpour. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulLee Chun-shik, 95, who was forced to leave Korea and work for a Japanese steel company during the 1910-45 Japanese occupation, attends Thursday's street rally at Seoul Square in downtown Seoul. He joined public voices against Japan's Abe administration, seeking an apology and compensation for Japan's wartime actions. The “international peace parade” on the 74th Liberation Day started from Seoul Square and headed a few kilometers north to the former location of the Japanese embassy. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulYang Geum-deok, 89, another survivor of forced labor by a Japanese company, returns to her seat at Seoul Square after delivering a speech to the crowd. She holds a sign that reads: “We condemn Abe administration, apologize for the forced labor.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulLee and Yang are surrounded by some of the crowd in Seoul Square. The placard held by Lee reads: “Apologize for the forced labor and commence the court rule of restitution.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe crowd from Seoul Square parades on Sejong Boulevard toward the former Japanese embassy site to deliver a petition signed by citizens. Pictured are the deceased who had been forced to move to Japan to work for a Japanese steel company during the Japanese occupation. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulMembers of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, in its annual campaign on Thursday gathering members from across the country to mark the 74th Liberation Day, put on a skit portraying embittered Korean women during the Japanese occupation at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukMembers of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions hold flags of the Korean Peninsula in Gwanghwamun Square, Thursday, during the group's rally. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukMembers of the Our Republican Party, who support the former South Korean President Park Geun-hye who was ousted from office in 2017 on corruption and bribery charges, and supporters of conservative civic groups hold an American flag as they campaign in front of Seoul City Hall on Thursday. They demanded the release and acquittal of Park, now in prison, and endorsed stronger Seoul-Washington ties. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThousands fill Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Thursday evening, for a candlelit cultural festival condemning Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The crowds were in unison on the 74th Liberation Day in criticizing Abe who removed South Korea from Japan's “whitelist” of preferred trading partners and has seldom shown efforts to apologize to and compensate Korean victims of his country's war crimes of sex slavery and forced labor during the 1910-45 Japanese occupation. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe anti-Abe rally continued until late night on Thursday at Gwanghwamun Square, with the participants holding pickets reading “NO ABE!” and paper cups reading “Citizens doing NO” with lit candles inside. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    A bronze statue representing a Korean forced laborer in Japan during the Japanese colonial period, at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, stands under a downpour. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulLee Chun-shik, 95, who was forced to leave Korea and work for a Japanese steel company during the 1910-45 Japanese occupation, attends Thursday's street rally at Seoul Square in downtown Seoul. He joined public voices against Japan's Abe administration, seeking an apology and compensation for Japan's wartime actions. The “international peace parade” on the 74th Liberation Day started from Seoul Square and headed a few kilometers north to the former location of the Japanese embassy. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulYang Geum-deok, 89, another survivor of forced labor by a Japanese company, returns to her seat at Seoul Square after delivering a speech to the crowd. She holds a sign that reads: “We condemn Abe administration, apologize for the forced labor.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulLee and Yang are surrounded by some of the crowd in Seoul Square. The placard held by Lee reads: “Apologize for the forced labor and commence the court rule of restitution.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe crowd from Seoul Square parades on Sejong Boulevard toward the former Japanese embassy site to deliver a petition signed by citizens. Pictured are the deceased who had been forced to move to Japan to work for a Japanese steel company during the Japanese occupation. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulMembers of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, in its annual campaign on Thursday gathering members from across the country to mark the 74th Liberation Day, put on a skit portraying embittered Korean women during the Japanese occupation at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukMembers of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions hold flags of the Korean Peninsula in Gwanghwamun Square, Thursday, during the group's rally. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukMembers of the Our Republican Party, who support the former South Korean President Park Geun-hye who was ousted from office in 2017 on corruption and bribery charges, and supporters of conservative civic groups hold an American flag as they campaign in front of Seoul City Hall on Thursday. They demanded the release and acquittal of Park, now in prison, and endorsed stronger Seoul-Washington ties. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThousands fill Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Thursday evening, for a candlelit cultural festival condemning Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The crowds were in unison on the 74th Liberation Day in criticizing Abe who removed South Korea from Japan's “whitelist” of preferred trading partners and has seldom shown efforts to apologize to and compensate Korean victims of his country's war crimes of sex slavery and forced labor during the 1910-45 Japanese occupation. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe anti-Abe rally continued until late night on Thursday at Gwanghwamun Square, with the participants holding pickets reading “NO ABE!” and paper cups reading “Citizens doing NO” with lit candles inside. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  2. Celebrating Korea-Czech relations
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
  3. To-be-built dormitory
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
  4. Return of Goryeo treasure
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
  5. Beauty pageant
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
  6. Dami Im in Seoul
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
  7. Testing time for students: Buddha, are you out there? [PHOTOS]
    Korean parents and grandparents are flooding to temples to pray for their children and grandchildren who are about to face the national college exam on Thursday. For the students, the College Scholastic Ability Test is the culmination of their many years at school and something that could determine their futures. Here, a woman is deep in prayer in front of Daewoongjeon, which is the main building inside Jogye Temple, in Seoul's Jongno District, Tuesday, where a special group prayer session for test-sitters was held. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukInside Daewoongjeon, visitors ― including mothers and grandmothers ― participate in a group prayer session as a giant television screen in the temple hall shows the names of those they came to pray for. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukFacing the hall inside Daewoongjeon, where the ceiling is filled with hundreds of mock candles paid for by visitors to express their faith, people read Buddhist scriptures as they wish well for their loved ones taking this year's national college entrance exam. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukInside Jogye Temple, visitors lit candles as they wish well for their loved ones sitting the 2020 College Scholastic Ability Test. Over 548,700 high school seniors are scheduled to take the test at 1,190 test centers nationwide. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukIn a section of the temple's grounds, a visitor adds another note to the thousands that contain names and messages from visitors wishing well for their loved ones sitting the test. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Korean parents and grandparents are flooding to temples to pray for their children and grandchildren who are about to face the national college exam on Thursday. For the students, the College Scholastic Ability Test is the culmination of their many years at school and something that could determine their futures. Here, a woman is deep in prayer in front of Daewoongjeon, which is the main building inside Jogye Temple, in Seoul's Jongno District, Tuesday, where a special group prayer session for test-sitters was held. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukInside Daewoongjeon, visitors ― including mothers and grandmothers ― participate in a group prayer session as a giant television screen in the temple hall shows the names of those they came to pray for. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukFacing the hall inside Daewoongjeon, where the ceiling is filled with hundreds of mock candles paid for by visitors to express their faith, people read Buddhist scriptures as they wish well for their loved ones taking this year's national college entrance exam. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukInside Jogye Temple, visitors lit candles as they wish well for their loved ones sitting the 2020 College Scholastic Ability Test. Over 548,700 high school seniors are scheduled to take the test at 1,190 test centers nationwide. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukIn a section of the temple's grounds, a visitor adds another note to the thousands that contain names and messages from visitors wishing well for their loved ones sitting the test. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  8. PM teaches Japanese Korean [PHOTOS]
    South Korea's Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon gives a pep talk to Japanese people learning Korean at the Tokyo Korean Culture Center in Japan, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe center, opened on May 10, 1979, has played an important role in promoting Korea to Japanese people. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukLee and Japanese students pose for a group photo outside the center in Tokyo on Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe Prime Minister inspects the center's exhibition hall that displays award-winning writing on South Korea-Japan exchanges by Japanese students. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukLee takes a close look at one of the pieces. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukJapanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe waits for Lee at his residence in Tokyo on Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukJapanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe looks serious before their meeting. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPrime Minister Lee Nak-yon meets his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe at Abe's residence in Tokyo on Thursday. Lee delivered President Moon Jae-in's personal letter to Abe. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    South Korea's Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon gives a pep talk to Japanese people learning Korean at the Tokyo Korean Culture Center in Japan, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe center, opened on May 10, 1979, has played an important role in promoting Korea to Japanese people. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukLee and Japanese students pose for a group photo outside the center in Tokyo on Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe Prime Minister inspects the center's exhibition hall that displays award-winning writing on South Korea-Japan exchanges by Japanese students. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukLee takes a close look at one of the pieces. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukJapanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe waits for Lee at his residence in Tokyo on Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukJapanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe looks serious before their meeting. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPrime Minister Lee Nak-yon meets his Japanese counterpart Shinzo Abe at Abe's residence in Tokyo on Thursday. Lee delivered President Moon Jae-in's personal letter to Abe. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  9. PM visits Tokyo's Korea Town [PHOTOS]
    Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visits Korea Town in Shinokubo, Tokyo, on Tuesday after attending the coronation of new Japanese emperor Naruhito. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Dong Sun-hwaSouth Korean Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visited Korea Town in Shinokubo, Tokyo, Tuesday, after attending the coronation ceremony for Japan's new emperor Naruhito. Lee tried a hot dog and toured the neighborhood lined with Korean eateries and K-pop shops. He reportedly asked store owners how business was. A big crowd turned out to greet him. Lee is set to meet Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday morning and deliver President Moon Jae-in's letter to him. Lee's visit raised hope that Seoul-Tokyo relations will improve. The two countries have imposed trade sanctions, among other things, sending relations to their lowest point.Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visits a food stand in Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukLee tries a hot dog in Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA big crowd gathers for Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon's visit. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA woman in the crowd claps during the Prime Minister's visit. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukChildren are among the crowd for Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon's visit to Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visits Korea Town in Shinokubo, Tokyo, on Tuesday after attending the coronation of new Japanese emperor Naruhito. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Dong Sun-hwaSouth Korean Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visited Korea Town in Shinokubo, Tokyo, Tuesday, after attending the coronation ceremony for Japan's new emperor Naruhito. Lee tried a hot dog and toured the neighborhood lined with Korean eateries and K-pop shops. He reportedly asked store owners how business was. A big crowd turned out to greet him. Lee is set to meet Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Thursday morning and deliver President Moon Jae-in's letter to him. Lee's visit raised hope that Seoul-Tokyo relations will improve. The two countries have imposed trade sanctions, among other things, sending relations to their lowest point.Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon visits a food stand in Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukLee tries a hot dog in Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA big crowd gathers for Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon's visit. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA woman in the crowd claps during the Prime Minister's visit. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukChildren are among the crowd for Prime Minister Lee Nak-yon's visit to Korea Town. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  10. Para Games: Shall we dance? [PHOTOS]
    Competitors in sports dance at the 39th National Para Games make their entrance at the Seocho Sports Complex in Seoul's Seocho District, Friday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe athletes competed in pairs ― one able-bodied and the other with physical disability. The competition promotes a message that both groups exercise their athleticism on the same playing field. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe dancers stepped out to cha-cha, rumba, samba, pasodoble and Latin Jive tunes. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSports dance was selected as an official program of the Games in Korea in 2007, in Andong, North Gyeongsang Province. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukOn the fourth day of the Games, the athletes included those with physical disabilities, impaired hearing, visual disturbances, impaired spinal cords and cerebral palsy. Those with visual disabilities wore eye patches during the event. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA pair rests after performing. This year, 56 men and 59 women participated in the program. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Competitors in sports dance at the 39th National Para Games make their entrance at the Seocho Sports Complex in Seoul's Seocho District, Friday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe athletes competed in pairs ― one able-bodied and the other with physical disability. The competition promotes a message that both groups exercise their athleticism on the same playing field. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe dancers stepped out to cha-cha, rumba, samba, pasodoble and Latin Jive tunes. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSports dance was selected as an official program of the Games in Korea in 2007, in Andong, North Gyeongsang Province. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukOn the fourth day of the Games, the athletes included those with physical disabilities, impaired hearing, visual disturbances, impaired spinal cords and cerebral palsy. Those with visual disabilities wore eye patches during the event. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA pair rests after performing. This year, 56 men and 59 women participated in the program. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  11. Blind footballers show off their skills [PHOTOS]
    Blind football players compete for the ball in a B1 game between South Chungcheong Province (blue) and North Gyeongsang Province (orange) during the 39th annual National Sports Festival for the Disabled at a stadium in Sangam-dong, Seoul, Thursday. The South Chungcheong Province team won 2-1. Athletes in the B1 classification are totally or almost totally blind. They play by relying on bell sounds from the ball and the voices of their coaches. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA South Chungcheong Province player uses dribbling skills to break through the defense. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA South Chungcheong Province player listens to his coach's instructions. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPlayers compete for the ball during the match. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe ball is modified to make a jingling sound. Players are required to say "go," or something similar when going for the ball. This alerts other players to their position. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA North Chungcheong Province player bleeds after bumping into another player during the game. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Blind football players compete for the ball in a B1 game between South Chungcheong Province (blue) and North Gyeongsang Province (orange) during the 39th annual National Sports Festival for the Disabled at a stadium in Sangam-dong, Seoul, Thursday. The South Chungcheong Province team won 2-1. Athletes in the B1 classification are totally or almost totally blind. They play by relying on bell sounds from the ball and the voices of their coaches. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA South Chungcheong Province player uses dribbling skills to break through the defense. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA South Chungcheong Province player listens to his coach's instructions. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukPlayers compete for the ball during the match. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe ball is modified to make a jingling sound. Players are required to say "go," or something similar when going for the ball. This alerts other players to their position. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA North Chungcheong Province player bleeds after bumping into another player during the game. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk