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Tue, January 19, 2021 | 08:39
  1. Turtle marathon
    Organizers and participants of the 436th Turtle Marathon pose on Mt. Nam in Seoul, Sunday. More than 3,000 people participated in the monthly event organized by The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times. / Korea Times photo by Ryu Hyo-jin
    Organizers and participants of the 436th Turtle Marathon pose on Mt. Nam in Seoul, Sunday. More than 3,000 people participated in the monthly event organized by The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times. / Korea Times photo by Ryu Hyo-jin
  2. Celebrating Korea-Czech relations
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
  3. To-be-built dormitory
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
  4. Return of Goryeo treasure
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
  5. Beauty pageant
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
  6. Dami Im in Seoul
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
  7. Polar vortex grips Korea [PHOTOS]
    People take a stroll despite the cold weather casting long shadows at Gongjicheon Amusement Park in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, Jan. 5. YonhapBy Kwon Mee-yooThe mercury has dipped way below freezing this winter and an Arctic cold air mass that swept across the country has been behind the frigid temperatures.Seoul saw temperatures drop to minus 18.6 degrees Celsius, Jan. 8, which was the lowest in 35 years. The lowest-ever temperature recorded in Seoul was minus 19.2 degrees Celsius, Jan. 5, 1986, according to the Korea Meteorological Administration, which began collecting such data in 1980. Buildings in downtown Seoul emit steam Jan. 8, when Seoul experienced its coldest temperature in 35 years at minus 18.6 degrees Celcius. YonhapTemperatures in the mountainous areas of Gangwon Province dropped to nearly minus 30 degrees.The cold spell also blanketed the country in thick snow. Jeju Island received over 50 centimeters of snow last week, with the accumulated snowfall on Mount Halla reaching up to 140 centimeters.Fishing boats stand in the frozen waters of the Geumgwang Reservoir in Anseong, Gyeonggi Province, Jan. 4. YonhapHeavy snowfall turned the local landscape into a white wonderland, but the seemingly beautiful scenery created some major headaches too. Heavy snow advisories and warnings had been issued and huge traffic jams stretched for kilometers along snow-covered roads in many parts of the country, while trains and flights were canceled.A neighborhood in northern Gwangju, a metropolitan city about 330 kilometers south of Seoul, is covered after heavy snowfall amid a cold wave warning issued Jan. 7. YonhapMost food delivery services, which have become practically indispensable during the COVID-19 pandemic, were also suspended due to concerns over the safety of motorcycle delivery people amid the heavy snowfall. As the extreme cold snap gripped Korea, over 7,500 reports of frozen and burst water meters were made from Jan. 6 to 11 and power demand reached an all-time high, causing blackouts in more than 78,000 homes across the country.People go canoeing on Soyang River in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, Jan. 8, when the province's morning low plummeted to minus 29.1 degrees Celsius. Yonhap
    People take a stroll despite the cold weather casting long shadows at Gongjicheon Amusement Park in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, Jan. 5. YonhapBy Kwon Mee-yooThe mercury has dipped way below freezing this winter and an Arctic cold air mass that swept across the country has been behind the frigid temperatures.Seoul saw temperatures drop to minus 18.6 degrees Celsius, Jan. 8, which was the lowest in 35 years. The lowest-ever temperature recorded in Seoul was minus 19.2 degrees Celsius, Jan. 5, 1986, according to the Korea Meteorological Administration, which began collecting such data in 1980. Buildings in downtown Seoul emit steam Jan. 8, when Seoul experienced its coldest temperature in 35 years at minus 18.6 degrees Celcius. YonhapTemperatures in the mountainous areas of Gangwon Province dropped to nearly minus 30 degrees.The cold spell also blanketed the country in thick snow. Jeju Island received over 50 centimeters of snow last week, with the accumulated snowfall on Mount Halla reaching up to 140 centimeters.Fishing boats stand in the frozen waters of the Geumgwang Reservoir in Anseong, Gyeonggi Province, Jan. 4. YonhapHeavy snowfall turned the local landscape into a white wonderland, but the seemingly beautiful scenery created some major headaches too. Heavy snow advisories and warnings had been issued and huge traffic jams stretched for kilometers along snow-covered roads in many parts of the country, while trains and flights were canceled.A neighborhood in northern Gwangju, a metropolitan city about 330 kilometers south of Seoul, is covered after heavy snowfall amid a cold wave warning issued Jan. 7. YonhapMost food delivery services, which have become practically indispensable during the COVID-19 pandemic, were also suspended due to concerns over the safety of motorcycle delivery people amid the heavy snowfall. As the extreme cold snap gripped Korea, over 7,500 reports of frozen and burst water meters were made from Jan. 6 to 11 and power demand reached an all-time high, causing blackouts in more than 78,000 homes across the country.People go canoeing on Soyang River in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, Jan. 8, when the province's morning low plummeted to minus 29.1 degrees Celsius. Yonhap
  8. Tangerine tea on Jeju: A sip of comfort [PHOTOS]
    This aerial shot shows tangerine peels being dried near the ocean in Jeju’s Seogwipo City. Cows graze in the pasture during spring, summer and fall and the area turns into orange color with tangerine peels being dried in winter. Dried tangerine peels are dried again with hot air and then are ground into powder to be used for skincare products, herbal medicine and feed for dairy cows. Courtest of Choi Jae-youngBy Kang Hyun-kyungStone, wind and women. These three are inseparable from the southern resort island of Jeju. Abundant stones are the result of past volcanic activities. Being surrounded by ocean, Jeju is windy. Women on Jeju are born to be strong. Perhaps more so than women in urban areas, Jeju women multitask to feed their children and send them to school as they dive, farm and make house. In wintertime, three more truly iconic Jeju scenes appear: tangerine tea, camellia and the island covered with snow. Tangerine peels being dried under the sun off the ocean creates iconic wintertime scenery on the island. Farmers peel the rind from tangerines and lay it out near the water. They are dried by the sun and the sea winds for years. The islanders sip a cup of tangerine tea with the dried peels to beat cold spells during winter. The dried tangerine peels are also used for herbal medicine to help the local farmers stay healthy. Red camellia flowers are covered with snow. They will bloom in winter and then the petals will fade. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngJeju is a rare place where people can watch flowers bloom during winter. Camellias are in full bloom between December and April. The islanders use camellia oil for various purposes: some use it for their hair and other skincare purposes, some for food. The flower is commonly spotted there because the islanders planted the trees to protect their houses from strong winds. Snow falls in Jeju Stone Park in the island’s rustic town of Jocheon in this undated photo. The eco park is a living exhibit of the local culture related to stone. Courtest of Choi Jae-youngJeju Stone Park covered with snow creates another wintertime sight to see. Stretching over 3.2 million square meters of territory in the rustic township of Jocheon, the natural park showcases several mythical figures and a goddess who are said to have created the island. The park offers a rare glimpse into the lives of the islanders and their culture. 
    This aerial shot shows tangerine peels being dried near the ocean in Jeju’s Seogwipo City. Cows graze in the pasture during spring, summer and fall and the area turns into orange color with tangerine peels being dried in winter. Dried tangerine peels are dried again with hot air and then are ground into powder to be used for skincare products, herbal medicine and feed for dairy cows. Courtest of Choi Jae-youngBy Kang Hyun-kyungStone, wind and women. These three are inseparable from the southern resort island of Jeju. Abundant stones are the result of past volcanic activities. Being surrounded by ocean, Jeju is windy. Women on Jeju are born to be strong. Perhaps more so than women in urban areas, Jeju women multitask to feed their children and send them to school as they dive, farm and make house. In wintertime, three more truly iconic Jeju scenes appear: tangerine tea, camellia and the island covered with snow. Tangerine peels being dried under the sun off the ocean creates iconic wintertime scenery on the island. Farmers peel the rind from tangerines and lay it out near the water. They are dried by the sun and the sea winds for years. The islanders sip a cup of tangerine tea with the dried peels to beat cold spells during winter. The dried tangerine peels are also used for herbal medicine to help the local farmers stay healthy. Red camellia flowers are covered with snow. They will bloom in winter and then the petals will fade. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngJeju is a rare place where people can watch flowers bloom during winter. Camellias are in full bloom between December and April. The islanders use camellia oil for various purposes: some use it for their hair and other skincare purposes, some for food. The flower is commonly spotted there because the islanders planted the trees to protect their houses from strong winds. Snow falls in Jeju Stone Park in the island’s rustic town of Jocheon in this undated photo. The eco park is a living exhibit of the local culture related to stone. Courtest of Choi Jae-youngJeju Stone Park covered with snow creates another wintertime sight to see. Stretching over 3.2 million square meters of territory in the rustic township of Jocheon, the natural park showcases several mythical figures and a goddess who are said to have created the island. The park offers a rare glimpse into the lives of the islanders and their culture. 
  9. Pyongyang celebrates New Year amid pandemic [PHOTOS]
    People watch the national flag raising ceremony and fireworks display to celebrate the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APA man salutes during the national flag-hoisting ceremony during celebrations to mark the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APExemplary workers during the national flag-hoisting ceremony during celebrations for the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APA fireworks display decorates the night sky to celebrate the New Year, as crowds of people look on, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APDancers perform during celebrations to mark the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APPerformers entertain the gathered crowds during celebrations to mark the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APDancers perform during celebrations to mark the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. AP
    People watch the national flag raising ceremony and fireworks display to celebrate the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APA man salutes during the national flag-hoisting ceremony during celebrations to mark the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APExemplary workers during the national flag-hoisting ceremony during celebrations for the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APA fireworks display decorates the night sky to celebrate the New Year, as crowds of people look on, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APDancers perform during celebrations to mark the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APPerformers entertain the gathered crowds during celebrations to mark the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. APDancers perform during celebrations to mark the New Year, at Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, early Friday, Jan., 1, 2021. AP
  10. Vaccination campaign begins [PHOTOS]
    A resident of a nursing home reacts as she gets an injection of the COVID-19 vaccine in Cologne, Germany, Dec. 27. APBy Kang Hyun-kyungCOVID-19 phobia shows signs of coming to an end as vaccination programs kick off around the world. Starting in Britain in early December, several countries have begun to inoculate their citizens to protect them from the virus that took the lives of over 1.7 million people globally since late 2019 when the first infection case was reported in China.In the United States, soldiers, veterans and healthcare workers were prioritized in the vaccine program. COVID-19 vaccines arrived in South Korea for U.S. military personnel and they got shots. The global vaccination programs made Koreans anxious in December as they didn’t hear from the government when they can be vaccinated.In this Dec. 15 file photo, a droplet falls from a syringe after a healthcare worker is injected with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at Women & Infants Hospital in Providence, R.I. The Vatican has declared it “morally acceptable” for Roman Catholics to receive COVID-19 vaccines based on research that used fetal tissue from abortions. APSyringes are prepared to administer the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine at a nursing home in Bad Windsheim, Germany, Dec. 27. ReutersPresident Moon Jae-in was under attack for his government’s ill-preparedness.After zigzagging about the government’s efforts to procure vaccines, Moon eventually unveiled the plan to inoculate some 20 million Koreans. He said he had a phone conversation with the head of Moderna to secure the two-dose vaccine.On Wednesday, the U.S. vaccine developer confirmed it’s in talks with South Korea to provide 40 million or more doses of its vaccine. It said the potential distribution of the Moderna vaccine is expected to start in the second quarter of 2021.Vaccines are put into a refrigerator by pharmacist Krisztina Biro in the Clinical Pharmacy of the University of Debrecen in Debrecen, Hungary, after the first batch of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines against COVID-19 arrived in the country, Dec. 26. APMoon and members of the ruling camp heaved a sigh of relief. Before the announcement of the vaccine procurement and inoculation plan, President Moon had been under mounting pressure. He was portrayed by opposition party lawmakers as an incompetent leader who didn’t do anything when other world leaders were in a hurry to procure vaccines to save their people from the deadly virus.South Korea is set to hold by-elections to elect mayors of Seoul and Busan on April 7, making Moon anxious about the possible fallout on the election results.“For the love of Native People” has been written in ink by a colleague on the arm of Dr. Sarah Hill, a dentist with the Seattle Indian Health Board (SIHB) and a member of the Spirit Lake Dakota tribe, after she received a shot of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, at the SIHB, on Dec. 21 in Seattle, Washington. AFPThe clock is ticking. And the main opposition party is set to use the vaccine card to criticize the Moon government. With the announcement from Moderna, President Moon will be able to deflect criticism over his vaccine diplomacy.
    A resident of a nursing home reacts as she gets an injection of the COVID-19 vaccine in Cologne, Germany, Dec. 27. APBy Kang Hyun-kyungCOVID-19 phobia shows signs of coming to an end as vaccination programs kick off around the world. Starting in Britain in early December, several countries have begun to inoculate their citizens to protect them from the virus that took the lives of over 1.7 million people globally since late 2019 when the first infection case was reported in China.In the United States, soldiers, veterans and healthcare workers were prioritized in the vaccine program. COVID-19 vaccines arrived in South Korea for U.S. military personnel and they got shots. The global vaccination programs made Koreans anxious in December as they didn’t hear from the government when they can be vaccinated.In this Dec. 15 file photo, a droplet falls from a syringe after a healthcare worker is injected with the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at Women & Infants Hospital in Providence, R.I. The Vatican has declared it “morally acceptable” for Roman Catholics to receive COVID-19 vaccines based on research that used fetal tissue from abortions. APSyringes are prepared to administer the Pfizer-BioNTech coronavirus disease (COVID-19) vaccine at a nursing home in Bad Windsheim, Germany, Dec. 27. ReutersPresident Moon Jae-in was under attack for his government’s ill-preparedness.After zigzagging about the government’s efforts to procure vaccines, Moon eventually unveiled the plan to inoculate some 20 million Koreans. He said he had a phone conversation with the head of Moderna to secure the two-dose vaccine.On Wednesday, the U.S. vaccine developer confirmed it’s in talks with South Korea to provide 40 million or more doses of its vaccine. It said the potential distribution of the Moderna vaccine is expected to start in the second quarter of 2021.Vaccines are put into a refrigerator by pharmacist Krisztina Biro in the Clinical Pharmacy of the University of Debrecen in Debrecen, Hungary, after the first batch of the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines against COVID-19 arrived in the country, Dec. 26. APMoon and members of the ruling camp heaved a sigh of relief. Before the announcement of the vaccine procurement and inoculation plan, President Moon had been under mounting pressure. He was portrayed by opposition party lawmakers as an incompetent leader who didn’t do anything when other world leaders were in a hurry to procure vaccines to save their people from the deadly virus.South Korea is set to hold by-elections to elect mayors of Seoul and Busan on April 7, making Moon anxious about the possible fallout on the election results.“For the love of Native People” has been written in ink by a colleague on the arm of Dr. Sarah Hill, a dentist with the Seattle Indian Health Board (SIHB) and a member of the Spirit Lake Dakota tribe, after she received a shot of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, at the SIHB, on Dec. 21 in Seattle, Washington. AFPThe clock is ticking. And the main opposition party is set to use the vaccine card to criticize the Moon government. With the announcement from Moderna, President Moon will be able to deflect criticism over his vaccine diplomacy.
  11. 2020 in pictures (August ~ December) [PHOTOS]
    A resting healthcare worker closes his eyes near a makeshift COVID-19 test center in Seoul Station, Dec. 14. The government established 150 test centers across the country to conduct free tests for three weeks that day. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulBy Kang Hyun-kyungMother Nature was cruel. It didn’t allow the pandemic-weary people to enjoy a brief respite from the virus-driven stress during the summer when infections slowed. Torrential rain ripped through the nation for over two months starting in June, forcing over 1,000 people to evacuate their homes, resulting in dozens of deaths and dozens more people missing. Around the time the natural disaster ended, confirmed infections soared again. Workers check Jamsu Bridge, Aug. 5, after it was flooded due to torrential rain during the summer. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe government played the blame game. It blamed protesters who gathered in Gwanghwamun Square, central Seoul, Aug. 15, for anti-Moon Jae-in rallies for the rise of infection cases, cracking down on those who initiated them. The measure drew a cynical response from the public.A model wearing a face mask poses at the Hill of Win Park near Gangnam Station in southern Seoul, Aug. 14.  Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAn unusually high number of people show up at Guro market, southwestern Seoul, Sept. 22, a week before the Chuseok long weekend, looking for construction jobs. Foremen and construction managers hire workers on the spot and take them to construction sites in the greater Seoul area. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe cases became resurgent from Aug. 14, a day before the scheduled rallies. Considering the virus has an incubation period of five days to two weeks, experts debunked the idea that the infections were a result of the anti-Moon Jae-in protests. The government stayed mum on its flawed virus measures. It encouraged people to travel to other cities and gather in movie houses and museums, saying doing so would help the economy. This turned out to be premature. A sweeper stands in front of garbage at a landfill site in Yongin City, Gyeonggi Province, Oct. 20. An increase in instant food consumption resulted in a pileup of waste. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukHealthcare workers suffered the consequences of the government’s mishandling of the COVID-19 disaster. As confirmed cases soared again in the third wave of outbreaks, some healthcare workers are experiencing burnout. As the number of COVID-19 patients keeps soaring, surpassing the milestone 1,000 daily cases, their fatigue has reached a peak. News reports about the shortage of intensive care unit beds have also scared the public. 
    A resting healthcare worker closes his eyes near a makeshift COVID-19 test center in Seoul Station, Dec. 14. The government established 150 test centers across the country to conduct free tests for three weeks that day. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulBy Kang Hyun-kyungMother Nature was cruel. It didn’t allow the pandemic-weary people to enjoy a brief respite from the virus-driven stress during the summer when infections slowed. Torrential rain ripped through the nation for over two months starting in June, forcing over 1,000 people to evacuate their homes, resulting in dozens of deaths and dozens more people missing. Around the time the natural disaster ended, confirmed infections soared again. Workers check Jamsu Bridge, Aug. 5, after it was flooded due to torrential rain during the summer. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe government played the blame game. It blamed protesters who gathered in Gwanghwamun Square, central Seoul, Aug. 15, for anti-Moon Jae-in rallies for the rise of infection cases, cracking down on those who initiated them. The measure drew a cynical response from the public.A model wearing a face mask poses at the Hill of Win Park near Gangnam Station in southern Seoul, Aug. 14.  Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAn unusually high number of people show up at Guro market, southwestern Seoul, Sept. 22, a week before the Chuseok long weekend, looking for construction jobs. Foremen and construction managers hire workers on the spot and take them to construction sites in the greater Seoul area. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe cases became resurgent from Aug. 14, a day before the scheduled rallies. Considering the virus has an incubation period of five days to two weeks, experts debunked the idea that the infections were a result of the anti-Moon Jae-in protests. The government stayed mum on its flawed virus measures. It encouraged people to travel to other cities and gather in movie houses and museums, saying doing so would help the economy. This turned out to be premature. A sweeper stands in front of garbage at a landfill site in Yongin City, Gyeonggi Province, Oct. 20. An increase in instant food consumption resulted in a pileup of waste. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukHealthcare workers suffered the consequences of the government’s mishandling of the COVID-19 disaster. As confirmed cases soared again in the third wave of outbreaks, some healthcare workers are experiencing burnout. As the number of COVID-19 patients keeps soaring, surpassing the milestone 1,000 daily cases, their fatigue has reached a peak. News reports about the shortage of intensive care unit beds have also scared the public. 
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