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Fri, September 30, 2022 | 21:28
  1. Enjoying spring while social distancing [PHOTOS]
    Cherry Blossom trees bloom along the National Mall following a rain shower March 28, in Washington, D.C. The Japanese cherry trees were gifted to Washington, D.C. by Tokyo Mayor Yukio Ozaki in 1912 and draw tens of thousands of daily visitors around peak bloom every year. AFP-YonhapBy Kang Hyun-kyungSpring came anyway. It survived the pandemic. Forsythias and azaleas signal the coming of the new season after a harsh, frozen winter. Cherry blossoms make us feel a season for life has just begun. Spring is not the same it used to be in the wake of the pandemic.Before the pandemic, spring was the season people looked forward to for gatherings and vacations.A flower bouquet is laid out on rainy farmland in Hanam, Gyeonggi Province, on March 28. YonhapCherry blossoms invited tourists from distant cities. Nationwide tourist attractions were crowded with overjoyed strangers.For trees and flowers, spring was the season to suffer. The coming of spring signaled torture. Walking along the cherry blossom-lined street, careless people picked flowers and tree branches to keep them as souvenirs of their visits.A man wearing a protective face mask takes a photo among blooming cherry blossoms amid the COVID-19 pandemic, in Tokyo, Japan, March 23. Reuters-YonhapOver-tourism led the flower petals to fall from trees early. Tourists then walked all over the fallen petals. The pandemic has enabled humans to put themselves into the shoes of other types of life. Amid the pandemic, people feel uneasy as they are still locked down and unable to visit those places again. They are missing the good old days as they forgo traveling.A bird’s eye view photo shows a green onion field on Imja Island in Sinan County, South Jeolla Province, on March 23. YonhapThe pandemic, however, is a blessing to plants. Mother Nature is intact, and so are her children. With fewer tourists, flowers bloom and die in their due dates. Flowers fall when times are ripe. Fallen leaves are not tortured by passersby.Climbers walk along a forsythia-filled trail on Seoul’s Mount Inwang on March 29. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSpring has become a livable season for plants, thanks to the pandemic. Let there be spring for Mother Nature and her kids. 
    Cherry Blossom trees bloom along the National Mall following a rain shower March 28, in Washington, D.C. The Japanese cherry trees were gifted to Washington, D.C. by Tokyo Mayor Yukio Ozaki in 1912 and draw tens of thousands of daily visitors around peak bloom every year. AFP-YonhapBy Kang Hyun-kyungSpring came anyway. It survived the pandemic. Forsythias and azaleas signal the coming of the new season after a harsh, frozen winter. Cherry blossoms make us feel a season for life has just begun. Spring is not the same it used to be in the wake of the pandemic.Before the pandemic, spring was the season people looked forward to for gatherings and vacations.A flower bouquet is laid out on rainy farmland in Hanam, Gyeonggi Province, on March 28. YonhapCherry blossoms invited tourists from distant cities. Nationwide tourist attractions were crowded with overjoyed strangers.For trees and flowers, spring was the season to suffer. The coming of spring signaled torture. Walking along the cherry blossom-lined street, careless people picked flowers and tree branches to keep them as souvenirs of their visits.A man wearing a protective face mask takes a photo among blooming cherry blossoms amid the COVID-19 pandemic, in Tokyo, Japan, March 23. Reuters-YonhapOver-tourism led the flower petals to fall from trees early. Tourists then walked all over the fallen petals. The pandemic has enabled humans to put themselves into the shoes of other types of life. Amid the pandemic, people feel uneasy as they are still locked down and unable to visit those places again. They are missing the good old days as they forgo traveling.A bird’s eye view photo shows a green onion field on Imja Island in Sinan County, South Jeolla Province, on March 23. YonhapThe pandemic, however, is a blessing to plants. Mother Nature is intact, and so are her children. With fewer tourists, flowers bloom and die in their due dates. Flowers fall when times are ripe. Fallen leaves are not tortured by passersby.Climbers walk along a forsythia-filled trail on Seoul’s Mount Inwang on March 29. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSpring has become a livable season for plants, thanks to the pandemic. Let there be spring for Mother Nature and her kids. 
  2. Celebrating Korea-Czech relations
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
  3. To-be-built dormitory
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
  4. Return of Goryeo treasure
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
  5. Beauty pageant
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
  6. Dami Im in Seoul
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
  7. Celebrating Chuseok [PHOTOS]
    People pay their respects to their ancestors at a graveyard in Gwangju, 329 kilometers south of Seoul, Sept. 10, which marks the Chuseok fall harvest holiday. YonhapPeople pay their respects to their ancestors at a graveyard in Gwangju, 329 kilometers south of Seoul, Sept. 10, which marks the Chuseok fall harvest holiday. YonhapResidents of Pohang, 272 kilometers south of Seoul, participate in a joint ancestral rite on Sept. 10, to mark the Chuseok fall harvest holiday. The region was hit hard by Typhoon Hinnamnor earlier in the week. YonhapPeople watch a traditional performance in Seoul, Sept. 10, the second day of the four-day Chuseok holiday. YonhapPeople watch a traditional performance in Seoul, Sept. 10, the second day of the four-day Chuseok holiday. YonhapA performer holding a fan jumps on a rope at the backyard of Korean traditional houses in Namsangol Hanok Village, also known as "A Village of Traditional Houses in Namsan Valley," Sept. 10. YonhapElderly South Korean men commemorate their ancestors in North Korea in Paju, around 30 kilometers north of Seoul, Sept. 10, marking the Chuseok autumn harvest holiday. Many South Koreans remain unable to return to their hometowns or be reunited with families in the North after being displaced during the 1950-53 Korean War. YonhapA full moon is seen in the sky near N Seoul Tower on Mount Nam in Seoul, one of the top tourist spots in the Korean capital, on the Chuseok holiday on Sept. 10. YonhapA full moon is seen in the sky near N Seoul Tower on Mount Nam in Seoul, one of the top tourist spots in the South Korean capital, on the Chuseok holiday on Sept. 10. YonhapHeavy traffic clogs a highway in southern Seoul, Sept. 11, 2022, the third day of the four-day Chuseok holiday. YonhapPeople arrive at Seoul Station, Sept. 11, after visiting their hometowns during the Chuseok holiday. Yonhap  
    People pay their respects to their ancestors at a graveyard in Gwangju, 329 kilometers south of Seoul, Sept. 10, which marks the Chuseok fall harvest holiday. YonhapPeople pay their respects to their ancestors at a graveyard in Gwangju, 329 kilometers south of Seoul, Sept. 10, which marks the Chuseok fall harvest holiday. YonhapResidents of Pohang, 272 kilometers south of Seoul, participate in a joint ancestral rite on Sept. 10, to mark the Chuseok fall harvest holiday. The region was hit hard by Typhoon Hinnamnor earlier in the week. YonhapPeople watch a traditional performance in Seoul, Sept. 10, the second day of the four-day Chuseok holiday. YonhapPeople watch a traditional performance in Seoul, Sept. 10, the second day of the four-day Chuseok holiday. YonhapA performer holding a fan jumps on a rope at the backyard of Korean traditional houses in Namsangol Hanok Village, also known as "A Village of Traditional Houses in Namsan Valley," Sept. 10. YonhapElderly South Korean men commemorate their ancestors in North Korea in Paju, around 30 kilometers north of Seoul, Sept. 10, marking the Chuseok autumn harvest holiday. Many South Koreans remain unable to return to their hometowns or be reunited with families in the North after being displaced during the 1950-53 Korean War. YonhapA full moon is seen in the sky near N Seoul Tower on Mount Nam in Seoul, one of the top tourist spots in the Korean capital, on the Chuseok holiday on Sept. 10. YonhapA full moon is seen in the sky near N Seoul Tower on Mount Nam in Seoul, one of the top tourist spots in the South Korean capital, on the Chuseok holiday on Sept. 10. YonhapHeavy traffic clogs a highway in southern Seoul, Sept. 11, 2022, the third day of the four-day Chuseok holiday. YonhapPeople arrive at Seoul Station, Sept. 11, after visiting their hometowns during the Chuseok holiday. Yonhap  
  8. Typhoon slams southern Korea [PHOTOS]
    This photo shows a severely damaged storefront in the southeastern port city of Busan after powerful Typhoon Hinnamnor slammed southern Korea, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows a devastated store in the southeastern port city of Busan after the powerful Typhoon Hinnamnor hit the city, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows firefighters removing a tree brought down by Typhoon Hinnamnor in the southwestern city of Gunsan, North Jeolla Province, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows a large rooftop water tank that was lifted by Typhoon Hinnamnor above a personal residence in Busan, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows cars turning back as the road ahead is inundated from heavy rain in the city of Gyeongju, North Gyeongsang Province, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows destroyed fencing above a seawall in Busan as the powerful Typhoon Hinnamnor slammed southern Korea, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows a bridge partly flooded in the aftermath of Typhoon Hinnamnor in Pohang, South Gyeongsang Province, Sept 6. YonhapA worker inspects a utility pole from an aerial work platform after Typhoon Hinnamnor hit the city of Yeosu, South Jeolla Province, Sept 6. YonhapThis photo shows a battered nursing hospital after its windows and walls were shattered by Typhoon Hinnamnor in the southeastern coastal city of Ulsan, Sept 6. YonhapThis photo shows a crumbling sidewalk caved in amid heavy rain from Typhoon Hinnamnor in the city of Sejong, Sept 6. Yonhap
    This photo shows a severely damaged storefront in the southeastern port city of Busan after powerful Typhoon Hinnamnor slammed southern Korea, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows a devastated store in the southeastern port city of Busan after the powerful Typhoon Hinnamnor hit the city, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows firefighters removing a tree brought down by Typhoon Hinnamnor in the southwestern city of Gunsan, North Jeolla Province, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows a large rooftop water tank that was lifted by Typhoon Hinnamnor above a personal residence in Busan, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows cars turning back as the road ahead is inundated from heavy rain in the city of Gyeongju, North Gyeongsang Province, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows destroyed fencing above a seawall in Busan as the powerful Typhoon Hinnamnor slammed southern Korea, Sept. 6. YonhapThis photo shows a bridge partly flooded in the aftermath of Typhoon Hinnamnor in Pohang, South Gyeongsang Province, Sept 6. YonhapA worker inspects a utility pole from an aerial work platform after Typhoon Hinnamnor hit the city of Yeosu, South Jeolla Province, Sept 6. YonhapThis photo shows a battered nursing hospital after its windows and walls were shattered by Typhoon Hinnamnor in the southeastern coastal city of Ulsan, Sept 6. YonhapThis photo shows a crumbling sidewalk caved in amid heavy rain from Typhoon Hinnamnor in the city of Sejong, Sept 6. Yonhap
  9. Typhoon Hinnamnor hits Korea [PHOTOS]
    A road in Changwon, 400 kilometers south of Seoul, is inundated due to heavy rain as the super strong Typhoon Hinnamnor htis Korea, Sept. 6. Yonhap This photo shows a large signboard that's been knocked over by strong winds caused by Typhoon Hinnamnor in Changwon, 400 kilometers south of Seoul, Sept. 6. Yonhap Trees are uprooted by heavy rain and strong winds in the country's largest port city of Busan, Sept. 6. Yonhap Waves hit a seawall in Busan on Sept. 6, as the super strong Typhoon Hinnamnor approaches the Korean Peninsula. Yonhap The sea off the coast of Seogwipo, Jeju Island, Monday, roils with waves as Typhoon Hinnamnor approaches from south. Yonhap A traveler looks at canceled flights in Jeju International Airport, Monday. All flights have been canceled since Monday afternoon due to the typhoon Hinnamnor. Yonhap A resident of Jeju Island walks through torrential rain, Monday, when the island was under a typhoon warning. Yonhap A fisherman in Buan, North Jeolla Province, works to move his boat to a nearby port in preparation for the approaching typhoon, Monday. Yonhap A construction site on a hill in Pohang, South Gyeongsang Province, is covered with tarps to prevent landslides caused by the typhoon, Monday. A COVID-19 testing center in Incheon is closed temporarily, Monday. The city's COVID test centers have all been closed due to the typhoon. Yonhap A resident of the southeastern city of Changwon looks out the window of his apartment, Sunday. Tape is put over the window in an X shape in preparation for Typhoon Hinnamnor. Yonhap Sandbags are piled up at a street corner in Busan's coastal Haeundae District, Sunday. Yonhap
    A road in Changwon, 400 kilometers south of Seoul, is inundated due to heavy rain as the super strong Typhoon Hinnamnor htis Korea, Sept. 6. Yonhap This photo shows a large signboard that's been knocked over by strong winds caused by Typhoon Hinnamnor in Changwon, 400 kilometers south of Seoul, Sept. 6. Yonhap Trees are uprooted by heavy rain and strong winds in the country's largest port city of Busan, Sept. 6. Yonhap Waves hit a seawall in Busan on Sept. 6, as the super strong Typhoon Hinnamnor approaches the Korean Peninsula. Yonhap The sea off the coast of Seogwipo, Jeju Island, Monday, roils with waves as Typhoon Hinnamnor approaches from south. Yonhap A traveler looks at canceled flights in Jeju International Airport, Monday. All flights have been canceled since Monday afternoon due to the typhoon Hinnamnor. Yonhap A resident of Jeju Island walks through torrential rain, Monday, when the island was under a typhoon warning. Yonhap A fisherman in Buan, North Jeolla Province, works to move his boat to a nearby port in preparation for the approaching typhoon, Monday. Yonhap A construction site on a hill in Pohang, South Gyeongsang Province, is covered with tarps to prevent landslides caused by the typhoon, Monday. A COVID-19 testing center in Incheon is closed temporarily, Monday. The city's COVID test centers have all been closed due to the typhoon. Yonhap A resident of the southeastern city of Changwon looks out the window of his apartment, Sunday. Tape is put over the window in an X shape in preparation for Typhoon Hinnamnor. Yonhap Sandbags are piled up at a street corner in Busan's coastal Haeundae District, Sunday. Yonhap
  10. Gwanghwamun Square Reopens [PHOTOS]
    A special ceremony of royal gatekeepers takes place near Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul to mark the square's reopening to the public after a major renovation, Saturday. YonhapCitizen representatives including Seoul mayor Oh Se-hoon, 5th from left, performs during an opening ceremony at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Saturday. YonhapPeople walk through a tunnel fountain at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul after it reopened to the public after a major renovation, Saturday. YonhapAn opening ceremony of Gwanghwamun Square is held in central Seoul to mark the square's reopening to the public after a major renovation, Saturday. YonhapChildren play at a tunnel fountain at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Saturday. YonahpPeople watch an opening ceremony at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Saturday. YonhapSeoul Mayor Oh Se-hoon speaks during an event celebrating the opening of Gwanghwamun Square in Seoul, Saturday. The square has been expanded and partially refurbished into a park. Yonhap
    A special ceremony of royal gatekeepers takes place near Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul to mark the square's reopening to the public after a major renovation, Saturday. YonhapCitizen representatives including Seoul mayor Oh Se-hoon, 5th from left, performs during an opening ceremony at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Saturday. YonhapPeople walk through a tunnel fountain at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul after it reopened to the public after a major renovation, Saturday. YonhapAn opening ceremony of Gwanghwamun Square is held in central Seoul to mark the square's reopening to the public after a major renovation, Saturday. YonhapChildren play at a tunnel fountain at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Saturday. YonahpPeople watch an opening ceremony at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Saturday. YonhapSeoul Mayor Oh Se-hoon speaks during an event celebrating the opening of Gwanghwamun Square in Seoul, Saturday. The square has been expanded and partially refurbished into a park. Yonhap
  11. Heavy downpour hits central regions [PHOTOS]
    Paldang floodgates open: Two people watch water being released from Paldang Dam in Hanam City, Gyeonggi Province, on Thursday after heavy rainfall. Heavy rain warnings have been issued in the metropolitan region, including Seoul. According to the Korea Meteorological Administration, torrential downpours are forecast to continue through Friday. YonhapBanpo Hangang Park along the Han River in Seoul is inundated as the river is swollen due to heavy rain, June 30. YonhapTrails and bicycle lanes along the Tan Stream in Seongnam, south of Seoul, are submerged and closed, as weather authorities issued a heavy rain warning for the capital and its surrounding areas, June 30. YonhapA person crosses a bridge in downtown Seoul over Cheonggye Stream which is flooded and closed after torrential rain pounded the capital city overnight, June 30. YonhapJamsu Bridge on the Han River in Seoul is partly inundated as torrential rain pounded the capital city overnight, raising the river's water level, June 30. Yonhap
    Paldang floodgates open: Two people watch water being released from Paldang Dam in Hanam City, Gyeonggi Province, on Thursday after heavy rainfall. Heavy rain warnings have been issued in the metropolitan region, including Seoul. According to the Korea Meteorological Administration, torrential downpours are forecast to continue through Friday. YonhapBanpo Hangang Park along the Han River in Seoul is inundated as the river is swollen due to heavy rain, June 30. YonhapTrails and bicycle lanes along the Tan Stream in Seongnam, south of Seoul, are submerged and closed, as weather authorities issued a heavy rain warning for the capital and its surrounding areas, June 30. YonhapA person crosses a bridge in downtown Seoul over Cheonggye Stream which is flooded and closed after torrential rain pounded the capital city overnight, June 30. YonhapJamsu Bridge on the Han River in Seoul is partly inundated as torrential rain pounded the capital city overnight, raising the river's water level, June 30. Yonhap
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