Tue, October 15, 2019 | 20:13
  1. Showcasing 8K QLED TV to US buyers
    A Samsung Electronics employee, right, introduces the firm's 8K QLED TV to U.S. buyers during the firm's national sales meeting at the Fairmont Austin Hotel in Texas in this photo provided by the firm, Friday. / Courtesy of Samsung Electronics
    A Samsung Electronics employee, right, introduces the firm's 8K QLED TV to U.S. buyers during the firm's national sales meeting at the Fairmont Austin Hotel in Texas in this photo provided by the firm, Friday. / Courtesy of Samsung Electronics
  2. Celebrating Korea-Czech relations
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
  3. To-be-built dormitory
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
  4. Return of Goryeo treasure
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
  5. Beauty pageant
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
  6. Dami Im in Seoul
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
  7. Autumn rain [PHOTOS]
    Floral decorations brave the rain at an entrance leading to Namsan Mountain Park in downtown Seoul, Monday. Up to 40 millimeters fell across the country, pulling the temperatures below 20C. The mercury is forecast to fall further on Tuesday, according to the Korea Meteorological Administration. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulVisitors climb the flower-flanked stairs leading to Namsan Mountain Park in downtown Seoul, Monday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulYellow petals on the wet ground. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulColorful flowers flutter in the wind. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulPeople walk along a flower-flanked trail leading to Namsan Mountain Park in downtown Seoul, Monday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulFlowers flutter against a high-rise backdrop. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
    Floral decorations brave the rain at an entrance leading to Namsan Mountain Park in downtown Seoul, Monday. Up to 40 millimeters fell across the country, pulling the temperatures below 20C. The mercury is forecast to fall further on Tuesday, according to the Korea Meteorological Administration. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulVisitors climb the flower-flanked stairs leading to Namsan Mountain Park in downtown Seoul, Monday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulYellow petals on the wet ground. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulColorful flowers flutter in the wind. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulPeople walk along a flower-flanked trail leading to Namsan Mountain Park in downtown Seoul, Monday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulFlowers flutter against a high-rise backdrop. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
  8. 'Cho Kuk OUT' [PHOTOS]
    Protesters hold placards that read “Moon Jae-in OUT,” at a rally against scandal-hit justice minister and President Moon in Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Park Si-soo Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of downtown Seoul on Thursday calling for the resignation of scandal-hit Justice Minister Cho Kuk. Many of them also urged President Moon Jae-in to step down ― though it seems unlikely ― to take responsibility for his “wrongful” appointment of Cho amid a widening corruption scandal involving the minister and his family members.The rally began around noon, three hours after Cho's wife Chung Kyung-shim was summoned to the Seoul Central Prosecutors' Office for questioning over suspicions including her alleged fabrication of a college president's citation to give her daughter an easier entry to a prestigious university here, and dubious financial investments. Protesters hold the national flags of South Korea and the United States in downtown Seoul, Thursday. U.S. flags are a prop that frequently features in rallies organized by conservatives who support a strong alliance between Seoul and Washington. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukProtesters wave the flags of South Korea and the United States in downtown Seoul, Thursday, calling for the resignation of scandal-hit Justice Minister Cho Kuk. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukProtesters flock to a thoroughfare in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAll eyes are on the prosecution, which will soon decide whether to seek an arrest warrant for Chung. If she is arrested, she will be the first wife of a sitting justice minister in Korea's modern history to be behind bars. This will essentially rev up resignation pressure on the minister, regardless of his involvement in the scandal.Prosecutors also are looking into evidence to determine if the minister is involved in the corruption scandal. Meanwhile, those who back the President are set to stage a rally near the Supreme Prosecutors' Office this weekend to show their support for the minister and Moon. A man dressed as Jesus Christ and “bleeding” from a crown of thorns speaks during the rally in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA man prays during the protest in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA female protester prays with her eyes closed and hands stretched to the sky in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA protester in the costume of a traditional Korean street performer takes part in the protest in downtown Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukFemale protesters sit on the ground, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Protesters hold placards that read “Moon Jae-in OUT,” at a rally against scandal-hit justice minister and President Moon in Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Park Si-soo Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of downtown Seoul on Thursday calling for the resignation of scandal-hit Justice Minister Cho Kuk. Many of them also urged President Moon Jae-in to step down ― though it seems unlikely ― to take responsibility for his “wrongful” appointment of Cho amid a widening corruption scandal involving the minister and his family members.The rally began around noon, three hours after Cho's wife Chung Kyung-shim was summoned to the Seoul Central Prosecutors' Office for questioning over suspicions including her alleged fabrication of a college president's citation to give her daughter an easier entry to a prestigious university here, and dubious financial investments. Protesters hold the national flags of South Korea and the United States in downtown Seoul, Thursday. U.S. flags are a prop that frequently features in rallies organized by conservatives who support a strong alliance between Seoul and Washington. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukProtesters wave the flags of South Korea and the United States in downtown Seoul, Thursday, calling for the resignation of scandal-hit Justice Minister Cho Kuk. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukProtesters flock to a thoroughfare in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAll eyes are on the prosecution, which will soon decide whether to seek an arrest warrant for Chung. If she is arrested, she will be the first wife of a sitting justice minister in Korea's modern history to be behind bars. This will essentially rev up resignation pressure on the minister, regardless of his involvement in the scandal.Prosecutors also are looking into evidence to determine if the minister is involved in the corruption scandal. Meanwhile, those who back the President are set to stage a rally near the Supreme Prosecutors' Office this weekend to show their support for the minister and Moon. A man dressed as Jesus Christ and “bleeding” from a crown of thorns speaks during the rally in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA man prays during the protest in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA female protester prays with her eyes closed and hands stretched to the sky in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA protester in the costume of a traditional Korean street performer takes part in the protest in downtown Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukFemale protesters sit on the ground, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  9. Absent for a reason [PHOTOS]
    A student who joined Friday's no-school protest to demand “grown-ups” do more to counter climate change painted his face with earth. He was one of hundreds of students from around the country who gathered at Sejong-ro Park in front of the Korean foreign affairs ministry in Seoul's Jongno District and marched to the Korean presidential office Cheong Wa Dae, a little over one kilometer north. Students in many countries joined in the global protest. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulChairs, desks and blackboards from school classrooms littered Sejong-ro Park. The scene displayed students' creative slogans in condemning the Korean government for not doing enough to fight climate change. The blackboard reads “Today's lesson is no-school climate protest” and “Student who didn't do homework is the Republic of Korea, the climate villain.” After the demonstration, the students collected the furniture and other props used in the protest. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulProtesters included students from Hankuk Academy of Foreign Studies in Yongin, Gyeonggi Province, who planned the demonstration, and from Seoul Foreign School in Seodaemun District. Their demonstration was part of a global movement inspired by Sweden's Greta Thunberg, who missed school every Friday to stage a one-person protest in front of the Swedish national assembly to demand more government efforts in dealing with climate change. Korean students also held no-school protests in March and May this year. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulA protester holds a sign with pictures of Greta Thunberg, left, South Korean President Moon Jae-in, top-right, and United States President Donald Trump. Thunberg gave an emotional speech at the United Nations Climate Action Summit in New York, Sept. 23. Thunberg, 16, told the audience of national representatives, “How dare you?” and criticized them for stealing her dream and childhood with empty words. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul Protesters throw beanbags at baskets to crack them open, a popular outdoor game often played on Korean schools' sports days. Each basket contained posters reading “Stop Coal” and “Greenhouse Gas Emission Zero.” The demonstration used the theme of a sports day as a more creative method for as many students as possible to express their opinions. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulProtesters march toward Cheong Wa Dae after the sports day-themed demonstration in front of the foreign ministry building. Students carry pickets that condemn the Korean government for responding poorly to the climate change issue. The government is rated “F” for countering the problem and “0” for “discerning the issue's significance; willingness to solve the issue; and reliability and practicality.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
    A student who joined Friday's no-school protest to demand “grown-ups” do more to counter climate change painted his face with earth. He was one of hundreds of students from around the country who gathered at Sejong-ro Park in front of the Korean foreign affairs ministry in Seoul's Jongno District and marched to the Korean presidential office Cheong Wa Dae, a little over one kilometer north. Students in many countries joined in the global protest. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulChairs, desks and blackboards from school classrooms littered Sejong-ro Park. The scene displayed students' creative slogans in condemning the Korean government for not doing enough to fight climate change. The blackboard reads “Today's lesson is no-school climate protest” and “Student who didn't do homework is the Republic of Korea, the climate villain.” After the demonstration, the students collected the furniture and other props used in the protest. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulProtesters included students from Hankuk Academy of Foreign Studies in Yongin, Gyeonggi Province, who planned the demonstration, and from Seoul Foreign School in Seodaemun District. Their demonstration was part of a global movement inspired by Sweden's Greta Thunberg, who missed school every Friday to stage a one-person protest in front of the Swedish national assembly to demand more government efforts in dealing with climate change. Korean students also held no-school protests in March and May this year. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulA protester holds a sign with pictures of Greta Thunberg, left, South Korean President Moon Jae-in, top-right, and United States President Donald Trump. Thunberg gave an emotional speech at the United Nations Climate Action Summit in New York, Sept. 23. Thunberg, 16, told the audience of national representatives, “How dare you?” and criticized them for stealing her dream and childhood with empty words. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul Protesters throw beanbags at baskets to crack them open, a popular outdoor game often played on Korean schools' sports days. Each basket contained posters reading “Stop Coal” and “Greenhouse Gas Emission Zero.” The demonstration used the theme of a sports day as a more creative method for as many students as possible to express their opinions. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulProtesters march toward Cheong Wa Dae after the sports day-themed demonstration in front of the foreign ministry building. Students carry pickets that condemn the Korean government for responding poorly to the climate change issue. The government is rated “F” for countering the problem and “0” for “discerning the issue's significance; willingness to solve the issue; and reliability and practicality.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
  10. Opposition leader has his head shaved; declares all-out fight against Moon [VIDEO]
    Main opposition Liberty Korea Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn has his head shaved near Cheong Wa Dae, Monday. Hwang became the latest politician to have their heads shaved to protest President Moon Jae-in's appointment of key political ally Cho Kuk as justice minister despite allegations of academic fraud and financial crimes surrounding his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe leader of the main opposition Liberty Korea Party (LKP) had his head shaved Monday in a show of protest, calling for the resignation of the justice minister, whose family is embroiled in corruption allegations.Politicians here often have their heads shaved in public to express dissent over political and social issues.LKP Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn had his head shaved at a plaza in front of Cheong Wa Dae to emphasize his call for Justice Minister Cho Kuk to step down.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family."Minister Cho should voluntarily step down from the post and face the prosecution's probe," Hwang said.Hwang followed in the steps of the LKP's Rep. Park In-sook who had her head shaved Tuesday. Rep. Lee Un-ju, an independent lawmaker, did the same thing last week.President Moon sent senior secretary for political affairs Kang Gi-jung to deliver a message of "concern and worry" over Hwang's move.Kang asked Hwang to reconsider the head-shaving move, according to Cheong Wa Dae spokeswoman Ko Min-jung. In response, the LKP leader reiterated that Moon should fire Cho.The presidential office wants to resolve a list of pending issues related to people's livelihoods via dialogue, Ko said.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA barber shaves Hwang's head using an electric shaver. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA throng of journalists and citizens watched his head shaving. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukHwang's hair lies on the ground. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe LKP protest comes after Moon appointed Cho as the new minister last week despite the prosecution's investigation into the corruption allegations.The prosecution is looking into suspicious investments in a private equity fund by Cho's family members.His wife was also indicted on the charge of fabricating a school certificate for her daughter.Cho denied any knowledge of the allegations during a National Assembly confirmation hearing held Sept. 6.Moon said last week that if he did not appoint Cho solely due to “unproven” suspicions, the move would set a bad precedent.The ruling Democratic Party of Korea (DPK) and the minor liberal Party for Democracy and Peace condemned Hwang's actions as a political move aimed at intensifying partisan wrangling."Hwang's move is nothing but an act to spark political strife or to reaffirm his (political) existence," the DPK said.Conservative opposition parties have condemned Moon's appointment of Cho and called for him to be dismissed.In particular, the LKP took issue with the ruling party and government's move to revise guidelines over the prosecution's handling of the media.The two will hold a consultative meeting Wednesday to discuss ways to limit prosecutors' alleged leaks to the press of details about their investigations and the indictment of suspects.They are considering setting a new stipulation under which the justice minister would be able to order surveillance of prosecutors suspected of leaking details to the media.Rep. Na Kyung-won, left, LKP floor leader, looks at Hwang. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSome LKP members also had their heads shaved before Hwang's head-shaving ceremony. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe justice minister oversees the prosecution in terms of human resources and administration."They are hampering the prosecution probe by hook or by crook. They are effectively blocking the investigation (into Cho's family)," LKP floor leader Na Kyung-won said at a meeting with members of the party's Supreme Council.The minor opposition Bareunmirae Party (BP) began to collect signatures from its lawmakers to submit a proposal to launch a National Assembly investigation into Cho.A proposal to demand an Assembly probe requires at least the participation of one-fourth of existing lawmakers, which means 75. As the BP controls 28 seats in the 297-member parliament, it needs cooperation from the LKP to submit the proposal.The ruling DPK, meanwhile, slammed the opposition parties for “focusing on political wrangling” and shunning calls to “improve the people's livelihoods.”"It is the prosecution that will investigate," DPK floor leader Lee In-young said at a party meeting. "It is time for the National Assembly to play a responsible role for the people's lives." (Yonhap)
    Main opposition Liberty Korea Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn has his head shaved near Cheong Wa Dae, Monday. Hwang became the latest politician to have their heads shaved to protest President Moon Jae-in's appointment of key political ally Cho Kuk as justice minister despite allegations of academic fraud and financial crimes surrounding his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe leader of the main opposition Liberty Korea Party (LKP) had his head shaved Monday in a show of protest, calling for the resignation of the justice minister, whose family is embroiled in corruption allegations.Politicians here often have their heads shaved in public to express dissent over political and social issues.LKP Chairman Hwang Kyo-ahn had his head shaved at a plaza in front of Cheong Wa Dae to emphasize his call for Justice Minister Cho Kuk to step down.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family."Minister Cho should voluntarily step down from the post and face the prosecution's probe," Hwang said.Hwang followed in the steps of the LKP's Rep. Park In-sook who had her head shaved Tuesday. Rep. Lee Un-ju, an independent lawmaker, did the same thing last week.President Moon sent senior secretary for political affairs Kang Gi-jung to deliver a message of "concern and worry" over Hwang's move.Kang asked Hwang to reconsider the head-shaving move, according to Cheong Wa Dae spokeswoman Ko Min-jung. In response, the LKP leader reiterated that Moon should fire Cho.The presidential office wants to resolve a list of pending issues related to people's livelihoods via dialogue, Ko said.Hwang said President Moon Jae-in should not turn a deaf ear to the public's call to dismiss the minister amid the prosecution's investigation into the allegations against his family. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA barber shaves Hwang's head using an electric shaver. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA throng of journalists and citizens watched his head shaving. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukHwang's hair lies on the ground. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe LKP protest comes after Moon appointed Cho as the new minister last week despite the prosecution's investigation into the corruption allegations.The prosecution is looking into suspicious investments in a private equity fund by Cho's family members.His wife was also indicted on the charge of fabricating a school certificate for her daughter.Cho denied any knowledge of the allegations during a National Assembly confirmation hearing held Sept. 6.Moon said last week that if he did not appoint Cho solely due to “unproven” suspicions, the move would set a bad precedent.The ruling Democratic Party of Korea (DPK) and the minor liberal Party for Democracy and Peace condemned Hwang's actions as a political move aimed at intensifying partisan wrangling."Hwang's move is nothing but an act to spark political strife or to reaffirm his (political) existence," the DPK said.Conservative opposition parties have condemned Moon's appointment of Cho and called for him to be dismissed.In particular, the LKP took issue with the ruling party and government's move to revise guidelines over the prosecution's handling of the media.The two will hold a consultative meeting Wednesday to discuss ways to limit prosecutors' alleged leaks to the press of details about their investigations and the indictment of suspects.They are considering setting a new stipulation under which the justice minister would be able to order surveillance of prosecutors suspected of leaking details to the media.Rep. Na Kyung-won, left, LKP floor leader, looks at Hwang. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukSome LKP members also had their heads shaved before Hwang's head-shaving ceremony. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe justice minister oversees the prosecution in terms of human resources and administration."They are hampering the prosecution probe by hook or by crook. They are effectively blocking the investigation (into Cho's family)," LKP floor leader Na Kyung-won said at a meeting with members of the party's Supreme Council.The minor opposition Bareunmirae Party (BP) began to collect signatures from its lawmakers to submit a proposal to launch a National Assembly investigation into Cho.A proposal to demand an Assembly probe requires at least the participation of one-fourth of existing lawmakers, which means 75. As the BP controls 28 seats in the 297-member parliament, it needs cooperation from the LKP to submit the proposal.The ruling DPK, meanwhile, slammed the opposition parties for “focusing on political wrangling” and shunning calls to “improve the people's livelihoods.”"It is the prosecution that will investigate," DPK floor leader Lee In-young said at a party meeting. "It is time for the National Assembly to play a responsible role for the people's lives." (Yonhap)
  11. Liberation Day on Seoul's streets [PHOTOS]
    A bronze statue representing a Korean forced laborer in Japan during the Japanese colonial period, at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, stands under a downpour. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulLee Chun-shik, 95, who was forced to leave Korea and work for a Japanese steel company during the 1910-45 Japanese occupation, attends Thursday's street rally at Seoul Square in downtown Seoul. He joined public voices against Japan's Abe administration, seeking an apology and compensation for Japan's wartime actions. The “international peace parade” on the 74th Liberation Day started from Seoul Square and headed a few kilometers north to the former location of the Japanese embassy. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulYang Geum-deok, 89, another survivor of forced labor by a Japanese company, returns to her seat at Seoul Square after delivering a speech to the crowd. She holds a sign that reads: “We condemn Abe administration, apologize for the forced labor.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulLee and Yang are surrounded by some of the crowd in Seoul Square. The placard held by Lee reads: “Apologize for the forced labor and commence the court rule of restitution.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe crowd from Seoul Square parades on Sejong Boulevard toward the former Japanese embassy site to deliver a petition signed by citizens. Pictured are the deceased who had been forced to move to Japan to work for a Japanese steel company during the Japanese occupation. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulMembers of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, in its annual campaign on Thursday gathering members from across the country to mark the 74th Liberation Day, put on a skit portraying embittered Korean women during the Japanese occupation at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukMembers of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions hold flags of the Korean Peninsula in Gwanghwamun Square, Thursday, during the group's rally. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukMembers of the Our Republican Party, who support the former South Korean President Park Geun-hye who was ousted from office in 2017 on corruption and bribery charges, and supporters of conservative civic groups hold an American flag as they campaign in front of Seoul City Hall on Thursday. They demanded the release and acquittal of Park, now in prison, and endorsed stronger Seoul-Washington ties. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThousands fill Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Thursday evening, for a candlelit cultural festival condemning Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The crowds were in unison on the 74th Liberation Day in criticizing Abe who removed South Korea from Japan's “whitelist” of preferred trading partners and has seldom shown efforts to apologize to and compensate Korean victims of his country's war crimes of sex slavery and forced labor during the 1910-45 Japanese occupation. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe anti-Abe rally continued until late night on Thursday at Gwanghwamun Square, with the participants holding pickets reading “NO ABE!” and paper cups reading “Citizens doing NO” with lit candles inside. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    A bronze statue representing a Korean forced laborer in Japan during the Japanese colonial period, at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, stands under a downpour. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulLee Chun-shik, 95, who was forced to leave Korea and work for a Japanese steel company during the 1910-45 Japanese occupation, attends Thursday's street rally at Seoul Square in downtown Seoul. He joined public voices against Japan's Abe administration, seeking an apology and compensation for Japan's wartime actions. The “international peace parade” on the 74th Liberation Day started from Seoul Square and headed a few kilometers north to the former location of the Japanese embassy. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulYang Geum-deok, 89, another survivor of forced labor by a Japanese company, returns to her seat at Seoul Square after delivering a speech to the crowd. She holds a sign that reads: “We condemn Abe administration, apologize for the forced labor.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulLee and Yang are surrounded by some of the crowd in Seoul Square. The placard held by Lee reads: “Apologize for the forced labor and commence the court rule of restitution.” Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulThe crowd from Seoul Square parades on Sejong Boulevard toward the former Japanese embassy site to deliver a petition signed by citizens. Pictured are the deceased who had been forced to move to Japan to work for a Japanese steel company during the Japanese occupation. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulMembers of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions, in its annual campaign on Thursday gathering members from across the country to mark the 74th Liberation Day, put on a skit portraying embittered Korean women during the Japanese occupation at Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Thursday. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukMembers of the Korean Confederation of Trade Unions hold flags of the Korean Peninsula in Gwanghwamun Square, Thursday, during the group's rally. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukMembers of the Our Republican Party, who support the former South Korean President Park Geun-hye who was ousted from office in 2017 on corruption and bribery charges, and supporters of conservative civic groups hold an American flag as they campaign in front of Seoul City Hall on Thursday. They demanded the release and acquittal of Park, now in prison, and endorsed stronger Seoul-Washington ties. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThousands fill Gwanghwamun Square in central Seoul, Thursday evening, for a candlelit cultural festival condemning Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. The crowds were in unison on the 74th Liberation Day in criticizing Abe who removed South Korea from Japan's “whitelist” of preferred trading partners and has seldom shown efforts to apologize to and compensate Korean victims of his country's war crimes of sex slavery and forced labor during the 1910-45 Japanese occupation. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukThe anti-Abe rally continued until late night on Thursday at Gwanghwamun Square, with the participants holding pickets reading “NO ABE!” and paper cups reading “Citizens doing NO” with lit candles inside. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk