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Sat, August 15, 2020 | 17:26
  1. Flashy maneuver
    The Air Force’s Black Eagles aerobatic flight team performs during the Seoul International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition 2017 at Seoul Airport in Seongnam, Gyeonggi Province, Sunday. / Yonhap
    The Air Force’s Black Eagles aerobatic flight team performs during the Seoul International Aerospace and Defense Exhibition 2017 at Seoul Airport in Seongnam, Gyeonggi Province, Sunday. / Yonhap
  2. Celebrating Korea-Czech relations
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
  3. To-be-built dormitory
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
  4. Return of Goryeo treasure
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
  5. Beauty pageant
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
  6. Dami Im in Seoul
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
  7. For years, orphans in Japan were punished just for surviving the war.
    Kisako Motoki, 86, speaks, looking though a red cellophane depicting what she saw the atmosphere of the night of the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, during an interview with the Associated Press at the Center for the Tokyo Raids and War Damage in Tokyo Wednesday, July 29, 2020.  In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP They were bullied. They were called trash and left to fend for themselves on the street. Police rounded them up and threw them in jail. They were sent to orphanages or sold for labor. They were abandoned by their government, abused and discriminated against.Now, 75 years after the end of the Pacific War, some have broken decades of silence to describe for a fast-forgetting world their sagas of recovery, survival, suffering _ and their calls for justice. The stories told to The Associated Press ahead of Saturday's anniversary of the war's end underscore both the lingering pain of the now-grown children who lived through those tumultuous years and what activists describe as Japan's broader failure to face up to its past.This aerial photo taken in March 9, 1945 shows the industrial section of Tokyo along the Sumida River. The nuclear bombs dropped by the United States on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Aug. 1945 secured Japan's surrender and ended World War II. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. APKisako Motoki was 10 when U.S. cluster bombs rained down on her downtown Tokyo neighborhood. For decades she kept silent about the misery that followed. On March 10, 1945, as the napalm-equipped bombs turned eastern Tokyo into a smoldering field of rubble, Motoki and her little brother hid inside a shelter her father had dug behind the family home. She eventually fled with her brother. She never saw her parents again. The children walked together by heaps of charred bodies. They saw people with severe burns slumped on the roadside, people with intestines hanging from their stomachs. She blamed herself for not waiting for her parents. She believed she'd caused their deaths.A war orphan polishes shoes in downtown Tokyo on Aug. 1, 1946. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. A 1948 government survey found there were more than 123,500 war orphans nationwide. But orphanages were built for only for 12,000, leaving many homeless. APMotoki went to her uncle's home, and this marked the beginning of her yearslong ordeal as a war orphan.She'd survived what's considered the deadliest conventional air raid ever. More than 105,000 people were estimated killed in a single night, but the devastation was largely eclipsed by the two nuclear bomb attacks and then forgotten during Japan's postwar rush to rebuild. As a schoolgirl, Motoki worked as a maid for her uncle's family of 12; they paid for her schooling in return. She was verbally abused, and her cousins repeatedly beat her brothers until their cheeks were swollen and bruised. They all ate only once a day.Unidentified U.S. Army men look over the bombed section of Tokyo, Japan's Ginza district, which is comparable to New York's Fifth Avenue, Sept. 3, 1945.  Building in center background seems undamaged. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. APKisako Motoki, who lost her parents and siblings to the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, speaks on her war experience at Kikukawa Bridge where she escaped from air raid bombing in Tokyo Wednesday, July 29, 2020. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP ``It's very painful for me to tell my story,'' she said. ``But I still have to keep speaking out because I feel strongly that no children should have to live as war orphans as I did.'' Motoki says her relatives, like tens of thousands of others, were struggling to rebuild their lives. They had little time to spend on orphans, even blood relatives. The government gave them no support. Many other orphans don't talk because of intense shame. ``How could we, as children, have spoken up against the government?`` she said. ``They abandoned us, and acted as if we never existed.``After years of pain, Motoki entered college to pursue her dream of studying music. She was 60. Mitsuyo Hoshino, 86, who lost her parents and siblings to the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, speaks on her experience during an interview with the Associated Press at the Center for the Tokyo Raids and War Damage in Tokyo Tuesday, July 28, 2020. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP___Mitsuyo Hoshino, 86, recalls the explosion of nationalism in November 1940, when Japan's wartime government staged a massive imperial celebration. During the war, Japanese schoolchildren were taught to revere the emperor as a god and devote their lives to him. On that November day, Hoshino stepped out of her parents' noodle shop in Tokyo's downtown Asakusa neighborhood and watched as huge crowds of people waved Rising Sun flags. A decorated street car clanged by, with banners glorifying the emperor and celebrating Japan's prosperity and expansion. A year later, on Dec. 8, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor.She remembers playing with her little sister outside of the now-vanished noodle shop. She remembers a family excursion to a department store. These were her last happy childhood memories. She was 13.Mitsuyo Hoshino, 86, who lost her parents and siblings to the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, stands in front of Chuwa Elementary School, the school she was attending then, in Tokyo Tuesday, July 28, 2020. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP Mitsuyo Hoshino, 86, who lost her parents and siblings to the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, shows her drawing of her experience during an interview with the Associated Press at the Center for the Tokyo Raids and War Damage in Tokyo Tuesday, July 28, 2020. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. APHoshino and her classmates evacuated to a temple in Chiba, outside Tokyo, in 1944, when U.S. firebombings escalated. She later learned from her uncle that her parents and two siblings died in the March 10, 1945, firebombing. Hoshino and her two younger siblings were sent to a succession of relatives. She escaped one time with her siblings from an aunt's house, afraid they were going to be sold to people needing workers and went to their grandmother's home.She later lived with another uncle's family, helping out on their farm while finishing high school. When she was grown, she returned to Tokyo, but she struggled with discrimination in getting jobs. She heard her husband's relatives hissing about her ``dubious background`` at their wedding ceremony.Much later, she decided to share her experiences by drawing for children, eventually compiling a book of 11 orphans' stories, including her own.One of those orphans, when asked what she'd wish for if she could use magic, simply says: ``I want to see my mother.''War orphans eat together at an orphanage in Tokyo  in 1946. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. A 1948 government survey found there were more than 123,500 war orphans nationwide. But orphanages were built for only for 12,000, leaving many homeless. APWar orphans sell ice candy near Ueno station in Tokyo May 7, 1948. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination.  A 1948 government survey found there were more than 123,500 war orphans nationwide. AP___A 1948 government survey found there were more than 123,500 war orphans nationwide. But orphanages were built for only for 12,000, leaving many homeless. Many children escaped from abusive relatives or orphanages and lived at train stations, earning money by polishing shoes, collecting cigarette butts or pick-pocketing. Street children were often rounded up by police, sent to orphanages or sometimes caught by brokers and sold to farms desperate for workers, experts say.The stories of the war orphans highlight Japan's consistent lack of respect for human rights, even after the war, said Haruo Asai, a Rikkyo University historian and an expert on war orphans. U.S. forces during their seven-year occupation of Japan also looked the other way on orphans, Asai said. More than 2,500 children of about 400,000 Japanese _ many of them families of Imperial Army soldiers, Manchurian railway employees and farmers who had emigrated to northern China, where Japan established a wartime puppet state _ were displaced or orphaned.In this photo taken and released by Xi Chunmei, Xi Jingbo eats a meal with his family in Linkou county, Mudanjiang city in northeastern China's Heilongjiang province May 15, 2018. More than 2,500 children of about 400,000 Japanese - many of them families of Imperial Army soldiers, Manchurian railway employees and farmers who had emigrated to northern China, where Japan established a wartime puppet state - were displaced or orphaned. Xi Jingbo's parents were Japanese, but he had no official record of his place and date of birth. Villagers told him he was left behind when the Japanese fled after the surrender. AP___Xi Jingbo's parents were Japanese, but he had no official record of his place and date of birth. Villagers told him he was left behind when the Japanese fled after the surrender. He and his adoptive parents didn't discuss the sensitive issue. ``We are the victims of the war,'' he said. ``All Chinese are victims, and so are the Japanese civilians.``A retired middle school math teacher and principal, Xi says he was well cared for by his Chinese parents and suffered no discrimination. He took care of them as they aged. After the last one died in 2009, Xi started making annual short visits to Japan. Mari Kaneda, 85, a WWII war orphan, speaks on her experience during an interview with The Associated Press Sunday, July 19, 2020, in Warabi, north of Tokyo. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. APMari Kaneda, 85, a WWII war orphan, shows a copy of family photo from year of 1944 during an interview with The Associated Press Sunday, July 19, 2020, in Warabi, north of Tokyo. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP___Survivors of the firebombings and orphans feel they were forgotten by history and by their leaders. Postwar governments have provided an accumulated total of 60 trillion yen ($565 billion) in welfare support for veterans and their bereaved families, but nothing for civilian victims of firebombings, although Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors receive medical support.Mari Kaneda, 85, says the firebombing changed her life, forcing her to live under harsh conditions with relatives. She suffered lifelong pain and stigma for being an orphan, and had to abandon her childhood dream of becoming a school teacher.Kaneda was 9 when she stepped off a night train in Tokyo after riding from Miyagi, in northern Japan, where she evacuated with her class. She had missed by hours the attack that killed her mother and two sisters and destroyed the family store.Japan's government has rejected redress for civilian victims of firebombings. But Kaneda, in her search for justice, has dug up postwar government records, interviewed dozens of her peers and published a prize-winning book on war orphans.``I haven't seen anything resolved,'' Kaneda said. ``To me, the war has not ended yet.''___Associated Press researcher Chen Si in Shanghai contributed to this report.___Follow Mari Yamaguchi on Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/mariyamaguchi(AP)
    Kisako Motoki, 86, speaks, looking though a red cellophane depicting what she saw the atmosphere of the night of the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, during an interview with the Associated Press at the Center for the Tokyo Raids and War Damage in Tokyo Wednesday, July 29, 2020.  In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP They were bullied. They were called trash and left to fend for themselves on the street. Police rounded them up and threw them in jail. They were sent to orphanages or sold for labor. They were abandoned by their government, abused and discriminated against.Now, 75 years after the end of the Pacific War, some have broken decades of silence to describe for a fast-forgetting world their sagas of recovery, survival, suffering _ and their calls for justice. The stories told to The Associated Press ahead of Saturday's anniversary of the war's end underscore both the lingering pain of the now-grown children who lived through those tumultuous years and what activists describe as Japan's broader failure to face up to its past.This aerial photo taken in March 9, 1945 shows the industrial section of Tokyo along the Sumida River. The nuclear bombs dropped by the United States on Hiroshima and Nagasaki in Aug. 1945 secured Japan's surrender and ended World War II. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. APKisako Motoki was 10 when U.S. cluster bombs rained down on her downtown Tokyo neighborhood. For decades she kept silent about the misery that followed. On March 10, 1945, as the napalm-equipped bombs turned eastern Tokyo into a smoldering field of rubble, Motoki and her little brother hid inside a shelter her father had dug behind the family home. She eventually fled with her brother. She never saw her parents again. The children walked together by heaps of charred bodies. They saw people with severe burns slumped on the roadside, people with intestines hanging from their stomachs. She blamed herself for not waiting for her parents. She believed she'd caused their deaths.A war orphan polishes shoes in downtown Tokyo on Aug. 1, 1946. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. A 1948 government survey found there were more than 123,500 war orphans nationwide. But orphanages were built for only for 12,000, leaving many homeless. APMotoki went to her uncle's home, and this marked the beginning of her yearslong ordeal as a war orphan.She'd survived what's considered the deadliest conventional air raid ever. More than 105,000 people were estimated killed in a single night, but the devastation was largely eclipsed by the two nuclear bomb attacks and then forgotten during Japan's postwar rush to rebuild. As a schoolgirl, Motoki worked as a maid for her uncle's family of 12; they paid for her schooling in return. She was verbally abused, and her cousins repeatedly beat her brothers until their cheeks were swollen and bruised. They all ate only once a day.Unidentified U.S. Army men look over the bombed section of Tokyo, Japan's Ginza district, which is comparable to New York's Fifth Avenue, Sept. 3, 1945.  Building in center background seems undamaged. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. APKisako Motoki, who lost her parents and siblings to the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, speaks on her war experience at Kikukawa Bridge where she escaped from air raid bombing in Tokyo Wednesday, July 29, 2020. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP ``It's very painful for me to tell my story,'' she said. ``But I still have to keep speaking out because I feel strongly that no children should have to live as war orphans as I did.'' Motoki says her relatives, like tens of thousands of others, were struggling to rebuild their lives. They had little time to spend on orphans, even blood relatives. The government gave them no support. Many other orphans don't talk because of intense shame. ``How could we, as children, have spoken up against the government?`` she said. ``They abandoned us, and acted as if we never existed.``After years of pain, Motoki entered college to pursue her dream of studying music. She was 60. Mitsuyo Hoshino, 86, who lost her parents and siblings to the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, speaks on her experience during an interview with the Associated Press at the Center for the Tokyo Raids and War Damage in Tokyo Tuesday, July 28, 2020. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP___Mitsuyo Hoshino, 86, recalls the explosion of nationalism in November 1940, when Japan's wartime government staged a massive imperial celebration. During the war, Japanese schoolchildren were taught to revere the emperor as a god and devote their lives to him. On that November day, Hoshino stepped out of her parents' noodle shop in Tokyo's downtown Asakusa neighborhood and watched as huge crowds of people waved Rising Sun flags. A decorated street car clanged by, with banners glorifying the emperor and celebrating Japan's prosperity and expansion. A year later, on Dec. 8, Japan attacked Pearl Harbor.She remembers playing with her little sister outside of the now-vanished noodle shop. She remembers a family excursion to a department store. These were her last happy childhood memories. She was 13.Mitsuyo Hoshino, 86, who lost her parents and siblings to the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, stands in front of Chuwa Elementary School, the school she was attending then, in Tokyo Tuesday, July 28, 2020. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP Mitsuyo Hoshino, 86, who lost her parents and siblings to the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, shows her drawing of her experience during an interview with the Associated Press at the Center for the Tokyo Raids and War Damage in Tokyo Tuesday, July 28, 2020. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. APHoshino and her classmates evacuated to a temple in Chiba, outside Tokyo, in 1944, when U.S. firebombings escalated. She later learned from her uncle that her parents and two siblings died in the March 10, 1945, firebombing. Hoshino and her two younger siblings were sent to a succession of relatives. She escaped one time with her siblings from an aunt's house, afraid they were going to be sold to people needing workers and went to their grandmother's home.She later lived with another uncle's family, helping out on their farm while finishing high school. When she was grown, she returned to Tokyo, but she struggled with discrimination in getting jobs. She heard her husband's relatives hissing about her ``dubious background`` at their wedding ceremony.Much later, she decided to share her experiences by drawing for children, eventually compiling a book of 11 orphans' stories, including her own.One of those orphans, when asked what she'd wish for if she could use magic, simply says: ``I want to see my mother.''War orphans eat together at an orphanage in Tokyo  in 1946. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. A 1948 government survey found there were more than 123,500 war orphans nationwide. But orphanages were built for only for 12,000, leaving many homeless. APWar orphans sell ice candy near Ueno station in Tokyo May 7, 1948. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination.  A 1948 government survey found there were more than 123,500 war orphans nationwide. AP___A 1948 government survey found there were more than 123,500 war orphans nationwide. But orphanages were built for only for 12,000, leaving many homeless. Many children escaped from abusive relatives or orphanages and lived at train stations, earning money by polishing shoes, collecting cigarette butts or pick-pocketing. Street children were often rounded up by police, sent to orphanages or sometimes caught by brokers and sold to farms desperate for workers, experts say.The stories of the war orphans highlight Japan's consistent lack of respect for human rights, even after the war, said Haruo Asai, a Rikkyo University historian and an expert on war orphans. U.S. forces during their seven-year occupation of Japan also looked the other way on orphans, Asai said. More than 2,500 children of about 400,000 Japanese _ many of them families of Imperial Army soldiers, Manchurian railway employees and farmers who had emigrated to northern China, where Japan established a wartime puppet state _ were displaced or orphaned.In this photo taken and released by Xi Chunmei, Xi Jingbo eats a meal with his family in Linkou county, Mudanjiang city in northeastern China's Heilongjiang province May 15, 2018. More than 2,500 children of about 400,000 Japanese - many of them families of Imperial Army soldiers, Manchurian railway employees and farmers who had emigrated to northern China, where Japan established a wartime puppet state - were displaced or orphaned. Xi Jingbo's parents were Japanese, but he had no official record of his place and date of birth. Villagers told him he was left behind when the Japanese fled after the surrender. AP___Xi Jingbo's parents were Japanese, but he had no official record of his place and date of birth. Villagers told him he was left behind when the Japanese fled after the surrender. He and his adoptive parents didn't discuss the sensitive issue. ``We are the victims of the war,'' he said. ``All Chinese are victims, and so are the Japanese civilians.``A retired middle school math teacher and principal, Xi says he was well cared for by his Chinese parents and suffered no discrimination. He took care of them as they aged. After the last one died in 2009, Xi started making annual short visits to Japan. Mari Kaneda, 85, a WWII war orphan, speaks on her experience during an interview with The Associated Press Sunday, July 19, 2020, in Warabi, north of Tokyo. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. APMari Kaneda, 85, a WWII war orphan, shows a copy of family photo from year of 1944 during an interview with The Associated Press Sunday, July 19, 2020, in Warabi, north of Tokyo. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. AP___Survivors of the firebombings and orphans feel they were forgotten by history and by their leaders. Postwar governments have provided an accumulated total of 60 trillion yen ($565 billion) in welfare support for veterans and their bereaved families, but nothing for civilian victims of firebombings, although Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors receive medical support.Mari Kaneda, 85, says the firebombing changed her life, forcing her to live under harsh conditions with relatives. She suffered lifelong pain and stigma for being an orphan, and had to abandon her childhood dream of becoming a school teacher.Kaneda was 9 when she stepped off a night train in Tokyo after riding from Miyagi, in northern Japan, where she evacuated with her class. She had missed by hours the attack that killed her mother and two sisters and destroyed the family store.Japan's government has rejected redress for civilian victims of firebombings. But Kaneda, in her search for justice, has dug up postwar government records, interviewed dozens of her peers and published a prize-winning book on war orphans.``I haven't seen anything resolved,'' Kaneda said. ``To me, the war has not ended yet.''___Associated Press researcher Chen Si in Shanghai contributed to this report.___Follow Mari Yamaguchi on Twitter at https://www.twitter.com/mariyamaguchi(AP)
  8. Jeju is suffering [PHOTOS]
    A bird’s eye view of Darangshi Oreum, a parasitic volcano that rises 382 meters above sea level, is located in the northeastern part of Jeju Island. The aerial views were captured from a drone camera. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngBy Bae Eun-jooEarlier this month, a group of environmentalists and activists protested against rampant development and destruction on Jeju Island and demanded the island province’s Governor Won Hee-ryong answer their repeated calls to preserve the island’s natural environment. The demonstration came in line with the government’s plan to build a second Jeju airport in the island’s eastern Seongsan area at an estimated cost of more than 5 trillion won ($4.2 billion). As Korea’s longtime favorite tourist destination is facing deforestation, environmentalists fiercely oppose forest lands being converted for reckless urban use, raising doubts over the reliability of feasibility studies, ecological evaluations and government transparency. Jeju is the only island in the world with three UNESCO designations — the international organization named Jeju a Biosphere Reserve in 2002, a World Natural Heritage in 2007 and a Global Geopark in 2010. Jeju boasts of shield volcanic Mount Halla, primeval forests, waterfalls and geothermal springs. “Citizens to Protect Bijarim Forest Road,” a civic group which has been fighting to protect Jeju, claims guarding Bijarim Forest is the first crucial step in preventing further destruction of the natural habitat. Plans for reckless expansion and excessive construction of Bijarim Forest Road will pave the way to a second airport and should be annulled immediately, the group says. Bijarim Forest, designated as Natural Monument No. 374, contains over 2,800 nutmeg trees between 500 to 800 years old and is known to be one of the world’s few forests with this single species of trees growing so densely together. Seongsan Ilchulbong, also known as “Sunrise Peak,” is a UNESCO World Heritage site and one of Jeju’s most famous geographical features. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngExtending over 448,000 square meters, the natural nutmeg grove on Mount Halla has been providing picturesque and, at the same time, therapeutic walks for many visitors. Among the evergreens is an 813-year-old nutmeg tree with a height of 25 meters and a girth of 6 meters, named “New Millennium Nutmeg,” which is oldest nutmeg tree in Korea and the oldest of all evergreen trees on Jeju Island. The tree is deemed a witness to the indomitable spirit of Jeju’s ancestors in overcoming hardships. Some locals believe in the mystical powers of this noble tree and pray to it for happiness and prosperity. The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport’s initial draft stated a second Jeju airport would be built on over 5.4 million square meters of land, with a terminal of 167,000 cubic meters in size. It will have 44 apron stops, a main runway 3,200 meters long and 380 meters wide, and six side runways. Reportedly, after the first construction phase is completed in 2035, the airport is expected to cater to over 17 million visitors a year. Following a completion of a second phase in 2055, the number is expected to surge to almost 20 million a year. Jeju Island saw over 14.4 million tourists in 2019, a whopping increase from 5 million just 10 years earlier. An aerial view of a funnel-shaped crater on top of Darangshi Oreum. The crater with a circular diameter of 3,391 meters still preserves its original shape unlike other craters in cones. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngThe local government has since converted over 99 million square meters of forest land into golf courses and resorts to make the island more attractive to visitors. Environmentalists claim tourists generate over 20,000 tons of garbage every year. The provincial government, being unprepared to dispose of the huge amount of waste, leaked untreated sewage into the ocean. With the new airport planned for the island, the inevitable environmental damage will become irreparable.
    A bird’s eye view of Darangshi Oreum, a parasitic volcano that rises 382 meters above sea level, is located in the northeastern part of Jeju Island. The aerial views were captured from a drone camera. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngBy Bae Eun-jooEarlier this month, a group of environmentalists and activists protested against rampant development and destruction on Jeju Island and demanded the island province’s Governor Won Hee-ryong answer their repeated calls to preserve the island’s natural environment. The demonstration came in line with the government’s plan to build a second Jeju airport in the island’s eastern Seongsan area at an estimated cost of more than 5 trillion won ($4.2 billion). As Korea’s longtime favorite tourist destination is facing deforestation, environmentalists fiercely oppose forest lands being converted for reckless urban use, raising doubts over the reliability of feasibility studies, ecological evaluations and government transparency. Jeju is the only island in the world with three UNESCO designations — the international organization named Jeju a Biosphere Reserve in 2002, a World Natural Heritage in 2007 and a Global Geopark in 2010. Jeju boasts of shield volcanic Mount Halla, primeval forests, waterfalls and geothermal springs. “Citizens to Protect Bijarim Forest Road,” a civic group which has been fighting to protect Jeju, claims guarding Bijarim Forest is the first crucial step in preventing further destruction of the natural habitat. Plans for reckless expansion and excessive construction of Bijarim Forest Road will pave the way to a second airport and should be annulled immediately, the group says. Bijarim Forest, designated as Natural Monument No. 374, contains over 2,800 nutmeg trees between 500 to 800 years old and is known to be one of the world’s few forests with this single species of trees growing so densely together. Seongsan Ilchulbong, also known as “Sunrise Peak,” is a UNESCO World Heritage site and one of Jeju’s most famous geographical features. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngExtending over 448,000 square meters, the natural nutmeg grove on Mount Halla has been providing picturesque and, at the same time, therapeutic walks for many visitors. Among the evergreens is an 813-year-old nutmeg tree with a height of 25 meters and a girth of 6 meters, named “New Millennium Nutmeg,” which is oldest nutmeg tree in Korea and the oldest of all evergreen trees on Jeju Island. The tree is deemed a witness to the indomitable spirit of Jeju’s ancestors in overcoming hardships. Some locals believe in the mystical powers of this noble tree and pray to it for happiness and prosperity. The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport’s initial draft stated a second Jeju airport would be built on over 5.4 million square meters of land, with a terminal of 167,000 cubic meters in size. It will have 44 apron stops, a main runway 3,200 meters long and 380 meters wide, and six side runways. Reportedly, after the first construction phase is completed in 2035, the airport is expected to cater to over 17 million visitors a year. Following a completion of a second phase in 2055, the number is expected to surge to almost 20 million a year. Jeju Island saw over 14.4 million tourists in 2019, a whopping increase from 5 million just 10 years earlier. An aerial view of a funnel-shaped crater on top of Darangshi Oreum. The crater with a circular diameter of 3,391 meters still preserves its original shape unlike other craters in cones. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngThe local government has since converted over 99 million square meters of forest land into golf courses and resorts to make the island more attractive to visitors. Environmentalists claim tourists generate over 20,000 tons of garbage every year. The provincial government, being unprepared to dispose of the huge amount of waste, leaked untreated sewage into the ocean. With the new airport planned for the island, the inevitable environmental damage will become irreparable.
  9. Crisis fatigue - Struggling to survive recession [PHOTOS]
    A restaurant owner squats in an empty street in Jongno 3-ga, July 30. The district, famous for its many eateries, usually bustles with office workers during lunch hour. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Bae Eun-jooAs the months-long pandemic is taking a heavy toll on the country, the economy has slumped into a recession, delivering the worst performance in over two decades. The Bank of Korea (BOK) reported the country’s real gross domestic product (GDP) shrank 2.9 percent in the April-June period from the same period last year, marking the slowest growth since the 3.8 percent year-on-year contraction seen in 1998 at the height of the Asian financial crisis. Economic lockdowns in major import countries were the biggest drag on the growth of Asia’s fourth-largest economy as it marked a 13.6 percent plunge in exports. This is the sharpest year-on-year decline in exports since 1974 when outbound shipments dropped 17 percent. The central bank noted that the Korean economy this year will likely suffer a heavier blow than previously anticipated due to the spread of COVID-19, and Korea’s economic growth will largely depend on the future course of the pandemic as well as the degree of global economic lockdowns. The government has rolled out over 227 trillion won ($231 billion) worth of economic stimulus packages to fight the economic fallout from the pandemic so far. And thanks to the federal cash handouts that boosted spending on dining at restaurants, grocery shopping and leisure activities, a modest 1.4 percent gain in private consumption has been reported from three months earlier. The shutters of a souvenir shop located in Myeong-dong, Seoul’s shopping mecca for foreign visitors, remain closed since mid-January when the first local case of COVID-19 was reported. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAn empty handcart is left standing in a street at Namdaemun Market, July 29. The pandemic has strongly affected almost every sector of the nation’s economy, especially small merchants. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulHowever, policymakers have little control over global demand for the country’s exports. Financial experts say consumer spending should recover gradually, while the threat from the virus is unlikely to fade entirely and some social distancing will need to remain in place. It all depends on how quickly a vaccine will be developed and how long the country can sustain itself until then. Korea has reported over 14,000 infections and around 300 deaths since the first domestic case was reported Jan. 20. The virus crisis has popularized “contactless” culture as an increasing number of customers have started ordering food using delivery apps. On the other hand, traditional markets and restaurants have suffered great losses. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulHomeless people fell victim to the COVID-19 pandemic as many homeless shelters closed their doors due to fear of infection. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulAlthough the figures are relatively low by global standards, the economic disruptions have still been damaging. Rising unemployment and economic losses are severe. South Korea’s large businesses have cut nearly 12,000 jobs in the wake of the pandemic, leaving many people distressed and depressed amid growing financial insecurity. Countries are reopening their economies gradually after months of pandemic lockdowns but fears of a fresh, stronger wave of coronavirus infections are weighing on them.
    A restaurant owner squats in an empty street in Jongno 3-ga, July 30. The district, famous for its many eateries, usually bustles with office workers during lunch hour. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Bae Eun-jooAs the months-long pandemic is taking a heavy toll on the country, the economy has slumped into a recession, delivering the worst performance in over two decades. The Bank of Korea (BOK) reported the country’s real gross domestic product (GDP) shrank 2.9 percent in the April-June period from the same period last year, marking the slowest growth since the 3.8 percent year-on-year contraction seen in 1998 at the height of the Asian financial crisis. Economic lockdowns in major import countries were the biggest drag on the growth of Asia’s fourth-largest economy as it marked a 13.6 percent plunge in exports. This is the sharpest year-on-year decline in exports since 1974 when outbound shipments dropped 17 percent. The central bank noted that the Korean economy this year will likely suffer a heavier blow than previously anticipated due to the spread of COVID-19, and Korea’s economic growth will largely depend on the future course of the pandemic as well as the degree of global economic lockdowns. The government has rolled out over 227 trillion won ($231 billion) worth of economic stimulus packages to fight the economic fallout from the pandemic so far. And thanks to the federal cash handouts that boosted spending on dining at restaurants, grocery shopping and leisure activities, a modest 1.4 percent gain in private consumption has been reported from three months earlier. The shutters of a souvenir shop located in Myeong-dong, Seoul’s shopping mecca for foreign visitors, remain closed since mid-January when the first local case of COVID-19 was reported. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAn empty handcart is left standing in a street at Namdaemun Market, July 29. The pandemic has strongly affected almost every sector of the nation’s economy, especially small merchants. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulHowever, policymakers have little control over global demand for the country’s exports. Financial experts say consumer spending should recover gradually, while the threat from the virus is unlikely to fade entirely and some social distancing will need to remain in place. It all depends on how quickly a vaccine will be developed and how long the country can sustain itself until then. Korea has reported over 14,000 infections and around 300 deaths since the first domestic case was reported Jan. 20. The virus crisis has popularized “contactless” culture as an increasing number of customers have started ordering food using delivery apps. On the other hand, traditional markets and restaurants have suffered great losses. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulHomeless people fell victim to the COVID-19 pandemic as many homeless shelters closed their doors due to fear of infection. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulAlthough the figures are relatively low by global standards, the economic disruptions have still been damaging. Rising unemployment and economic losses are severe. South Korea’s large businesses have cut nearly 12,000 jobs in the wake of the pandemic, leaving many people distressed and depressed amid growing financial insecurity. Countries are reopening their economies gradually after months of pandemic lockdowns but fears of a fresh, stronger wave of coronavirus infections are weighing on them.
  10. Beirut blast: Dozens dead and thousands injured [PHOTOS]
    An injured man walks at the explosion scene that hit the seaport, in Beirut Lebanon, Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Massive explosions rocked downtown Beirut on Tuesday, flattening much of the port, damaging buildings and blowing out windows and doors as a giant mushroom cloud rose above the capital. Witnesses saw many people injured by flying glass and debris. AP  A view of the damaged buildings next to the site of an explosion at the Beirut Port, Beirut, Lebanon, 04 August 2020. EPA  A picture shows the scene of an explosion in Beirut on August 4, 2020. AFP Firefighters douse a blaze at the scene of an explosion at the port of Lebanon's capital Beirut on August 4, 2020. AFP A general view shows the aftermath at the site of Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area, Lebanon August 5, 2020. Reuters
    An injured man walks at the explosion scene that hit the seaport, in Beirut Lebanon, Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2020. Massive explosions rocked downtown Beirut on Tuesday, flattening much of the port, damaging buildings and blowing out windows and doors as a giant mushroom cloud rose above the capital. Witnesses saw many people injured by flying glass and debris. AP  A view of the damaged buildings next to the site of an explosion at the Beirut Port, Beirut, Lebanon, 04 August 2020. EPA  A picture shows the scene of an explosion in Beirut on August 4, 2020. AFP Firefighters douse a blaze at the scene of an explosion at the port of Lebanon's capital Beirut on August 4, 2020. AFP A general view shows the aftermath at the site of Tuesday's blast in Beirut's port area, Lebanon August 5, 2020. Reuters
  11. Heavy rain hammers South Korea [PHOTOS]
    A worker begins the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Damage from heavy rain that pounded the country's central region earlier this week continued to grow, leaving 14 dead and 12 missing as of Tuesday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulWorkers begin the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulWorkers begin the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulA worker begins the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulWorkers begin the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
    A worker begins the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Damage from heavy rain that pounded the country's central region earlier this week continued to grow, leaving 14 dead and 12 missing as of Tuesday. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulWorkers begin the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulWorkers begin the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulA worker begins the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulWorkers begin the clean-up in the aftermath of a torrential rain storm that hit the capital city at Han River park on August 04, 2020 in Seoul, South Korea. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chul
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