alt
Posted : 2013-06-18 17:29
Updated : 2013-06-18 17:29

KISA, FireEye team up for cyber security

KISA President Lee Ki-joo, right, shakes hands with FireEye CEO Dave DeWalt after signing a memorandum of understanding (MOU) for a business partnership in Seoul, Tuesday. / Courtesy of KISA

By Kim Yoo-chul

The Korea Internet and Security Agency (KISA) said Tuesday that it has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with U.S.-based security platform provider FireEye to jointly fight increasing cyber attacks.

"FireEye agreed to share its business know-how with KISA to better protect Korean companies and organizations from cyber attacks. The agreement will help us build a
more proactive cyber defense system," the state agency said in a statement.

FireEye plans to provide various analytic tools to KISA to help it find out Internet protocols used in cyber attacks. The two will also jointly hold educational programs including workshops.

"It's vital to track hackers and violators on a real-time basis to better cover sophisticated cyber attacks. The MOU will help KISA enhance our cyber security management," KISA President Lee Ki-joo was quoted as saying in the statement.

Although over 90 percent of countries have anti-malware communication servers, cyber attacks are a serious threat for organizations today, according to KISA officials.

In a press conference Tuesday at FireEye's office in Seoul, the firm's Chief Executive Dave DeWalt earlier cautioned that Korea is highly vulnerable to sophisticated cyber attacks.

He said demand for advanced cyber security-related solutions will rise because more private and public companies are taking countermeasures in the wake of recent hackings.

"Hacking technologies have outpaced traditional signature-based security defenses, such as antivirus, and permeated around the world, enabling cyber criminals to easily evade detection and establish connections inside the perimeter of major organizations," Dewalt said.

In its latest report, FireEye insisted that attackers tend to send initial callbacks to control servers within the same nation in which the target resides to improve evasion techniques and analyze which countries could be hit.


  • 1. Beauty contestant runs off with pricy tiara
  • 2. Brazil's 'woman-town' calls for single guys
  • 3. Teen catches largemouth bass from sewer
  • 4. Salvation Sect holds funeral held for Sewol owner
  • 5. One-fifth of women 'stalk' ex-lovers on Internet: survey
  • 6. Short men less prone to divorce: study
  • 7. NO END IN SIGHT: Korea's household debt dilemma
  • 8. Daniel Dae Kim to remake 'Good Doctor' for CBS
  • 9. Samsung, LG ready to display future of electronics
  • 10. North Korea owes $395 million for 1,000 Volvos
Copy editors wanted
Experienced reporters wanted