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Posted : 2011-08-21 15:52
Updated : 2011-08-21 15:52

LG provokes Samsung, Sony with 3D TV ads


LG Electronics’ advertisement published in USA Today
By Kim Yoo-chul

LG Electronics, the world's second-biggest television maker, is desperate to establish itself as a leading brand in 3D sets and appears to be growing bolder in criticizing competing products from archrival Samsung Electronics.

Although the demand for high-end electronic goods seems to have taken a hit with the worsening debt problems in Western economies, LG is looking to exploit the softened competition to strengthen its position in 3D TVs, which the electronics industry still insists is the natural successor to today’s conventional LCD flat screens.

The company is looking to increase its advertising budget for its patented film patterned retarder (FPR) technology, which the firm claims provides sharper quality than rival products while allowing viewers to wear less-clunky glasses.

Sony and Samsung, which have been the biggest-names in the nascent 3D TV market, have been employing a different system. LG hasn't been shy in expressing which company it believes has the superior products.

In an advertisement published in the latest edition of USA Today, LG asks, "Hey Sony and Samsung, remind us why people need those heavy, battery-burdened, left-right blinkety-sync 3D glasses?"

In earlier ads in newspapers such as the Wall Street Journal and New York Times, the company advised Samsung and Sony to “stick to 2D.”

The provocative ads kick off LG’s renewed promotional efforts for 3D televisions in the U.S., which will include campaigns in major cities.

The company will also expand the “LG Cinema 3D Gaming Championship” events in Europe, although it declined to reveal specific budgets for the marketing campaigns.

“Russia and Canada are our next targets and the number of countries reached by the campaigns will be expanded to 20 by the end of this year,” said LG spokesman Jerry Kim, Sunday.

Although global 3D TV sales have been underwhelming so far due to high prices and a lack of content, electronics makers believe they can ill-afford to fall as an also-ran in stereoscopic televisions.

LG has been trying to differentiate its passive glasses-based FPR technology, which says produces TVs with less “cross-talk,” or the overlapping of images, and flickering.

Samsung and Sony’s products, based on “active glasses,” are said to provide more vivid images, but they burden consumers with more expensive and heavy battery-powered eyewear.

Samsung declined official comment on LG’s ads.

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