Costume pattern for queens found

2013-01-29 : 15:57

A costume pattern which was drawn to make an official garment called “jeokui” (inset) for the queens and crown princesses of the Joseon Kingdom (1392-1910) was revealed at the National Palace Museum of Korea in Seoul, Tuesday.                                                                                                 / National Palace Museum of Korea


By Chung Ah-young

The National Palace Museum of Korea unveiled a costume pattern which was drawn to make an official garment for the queens and crown princesses of the Joseon Kingdom (1392-1910) Tuesday.

The museum revealed its investigation founding on its magazine “Palace Culture,” saying that the pattern was drawn on “hanji” (traditional mulberry paper) along with a slew of colorful paintings of pheasants, which were only included in the queen’s robes called “jeokui.”

“Jeokui” refers to the royal official garment mostly patterned with pheasants which symbolize the dignity of the queens or crown princesses during the Joseon Kingdom.
The pattern was originally discovered beneath the floor of the Daejo Hall (queen’s residence) of Changdeok Palace during restoration work last November. The investigation team sent it to the museum to preserve and restore the pattern.

“It’s very rare as only three pieces of “jeokui” remain. So the pattern which was used for making “jeokui” is crucial for studying the Joseon royal garments. The recent discovery is very meaningful as jeokui is the key source in royal attire,” the museum said.

The pattern is estimated to have been drawn around 1920 for making a robe with a length of 148 to 153 centimeters as the hall was reconstructed that time after being burned down in 1917.

“Although the pattern was made after the Korean Empire collapsed, it is important in investigating the royal attire during the Joseon Kingdom and Korean Empire,” it said.